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Functional hearing deficits in children with Type 1 diabetes

Rance, G.; Chisari, D.; Edvall, Niklas and Cameron, F. (2016) In Diabetic Medicine 33(9). p.1268-1274
Abstract

Aim: Hearing loss (as reflected by abnormal sound detection) is a frequently reported consequence of Type 1 diabetes mellitus. We sought to evaluate sound detection, auditory neural function and binaural processing ability in a group of school-aged participants with Type 1 diabetes and to assess their functional hearing and general communication ability. Methods: A range of electroacoustic, electrophysiological and behavioural test techniques were used to evaluate both cochlear and auditory neural function in 19 affected children. A cohort of matched controls was also assessed. Results: Although all of the participants with Type 1 diabetes enjoyed normal sound detection, 9 of the 19 (47%) showed evidence of auditory pathway abnormality... (More)

Aim: Hearing loss (as reflected by abnormal sound detection) is a frequently reported consequence of Type 1 diabetes mellitus. We sought to evaluate sound detection, auditory neural function and binaural processing ability in a group of school-aged participants with Type 1 diabetes and to assess their functional hearing and general communication ability. Methods: A range of electroacoustic, electrophysiological and behavioural test techniques were used to evaluate both cochlear and auditory neural function in 19 affected children. A cohort of matched controls was also assessed. Results: Although all of the participants with Type 1 diabetes enjoyed normal sound detection, 9 of the 19 (47%) showed evidence of auditory pathway abnormality with evoked potential latencies and/or amplitudes beyond age-related norms. Auditory brainstem response interpeak latencies (wave I-V) were longer than in matched controls [ 95% confidence interval (95% CI); 0.10, 0.28 ms: P <0.001] and wave V amplitudes were reduced (95% CI; -0.21, 0.00 μV: P = 0.02). Binaural speech perception in noise was also impaired (95% CI; 0.82, 3.17 dB: P = 0.002) and perceptual ability was correlated with degree of neural disruption in the auditory brainstem (r = 0.662, P = 0.003). Conclusions: Hearing deficits severe enough to restrict communication and threaten academic progress were common on our group of school-aged children with Type 1 diabetes. Evaluation of both cochlear and auditory neural function may form an important part of the standard management regime for children with diabetes.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
in
Diabetic Medicine
volume
33
issue
9
pages
1268 - 1274
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84959153715
ISSN
0742-3071
DOI
10.1111/dme.13086
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
0bdaecf5-b05f-4e5f-8df7-5b4e944a1c03
date added to LUP
2016-05-13 12:06:22
date last changed
2016-09-01 16:42:13
@misc{0bdaecf5-b05f-4e5f-8df7-5b4e944a1c03,
  abstract     = {<p>Aim: Hearing loss (as reflected by abnormal sound detection) is a frequently reported consequence of Type 1 diabetes mellitus. We sought to evaluate sound detection, auditory neural function and binaural processing ability in a group of school-aged participants with Type 1 diabetes and to assess their functional hearing and general communication ability. Methods: A range of electroacoustic, electrophysiological and behavioural test techniques were used to evaluate both cochlear and auditory neural function in 19 affected children. A cohort of matched controls was also assessed. Results: Although all of the participants with Type 1 diabetes enjoyed normal sound detection, 9 of the 19 (47%) showed evidence of auditory pathway abnormality with evoked potential latencies and/or amplitudes beyond age-related norms. Auditory brainstem response interpeak latencies (wave I-V) were longer than in matched controls [ 95% confidence interval (95% CI); 0.10, 0.28 ms: P &lt;0.001] and wave V amplitudes were reduced (95% CI; -0.21, 0.00 μV: P = 0.02). Binaural speech perception in noise was also impaired (95% CI; 0.82, 3.17 dB: P = 0.002) and perceptual ability was correlated with degree of neural disruption in the auditory brainstem (r = 0.662, P = 0.003). Conclusions: Hearing deficits severe enough to restrict communication and threaten academic progress were common on our group of school-aged children with Type 1 diabetes. Evaluation of both cochlear and auditory neural function may form an important part of the standard management regime for children with diabetes.</p>},
  author       = {Rance, G. and Chisari, D. and Edvall, Niklas and Cameron, F.},
  issn         = {0742-3071},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1268--1274},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xae6c858)},
  series       = {Diabetic Medicine},
  title        = {Functional hearing deficits in children with Type 1 diabetes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.13086},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2016},
}