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Yielding behaviour and interaction at bicycle crossings

Hydén, Christer LU ; Svensson, Åse LU and Sakshaug, Lisa LU (2007) TRB's 3rd Urban Street Symposium
Abstract
The main purpose of this study was to learn more about how bicyclists and motor vehicle drivers in some Swedish cities interact at intersections and how the yielding rules, different intersection designs, vehicle flows and speed affect the behaviour.



Field studies were performed at 25 crossings for six hours each. Cycle crossings on links, at three- and four-armed intersections as well as at roundabouts were studied.



Preliminary results show that yielding rules are not enough to make road users behave as intended; even when there are yielding signs and markings before the bicycle crossing, 30% of the motor vehicle drivers do not yield to bicyclists. Fewer yield to bicyclists when motor vehicle speed is... (More)
The main purpose of this study was to learn more about how bicyclists and motor vehicle drivers in some Swedish cities interact at intersections and how the yielding rules, different intersection designs, vehicle flows and speed affect the behaviour.



Field studies were performed at 25 crossings for six hours each. Cycle crossings on links, at three- and four-armed intersections as well as at roundabouts were studied.



Preliminary results show that yielding rules are not enough to make road users behave as intended; even when there are yielding signs and markings before the bicycle crossing, 30% of the motor vehicle drivers do not yield to bicyclists. Fewer yield to bicyclists when motor vehicle speed is higher, when motor vehicle flow is larger and when bicycle flow is smaller. Speeds below 30 km/h seem to produce quite favourable conditions for an

interaction with a high degree of equity, efficiency and safety for both road users no matter whether car drivers have to yield according to the rules or not. Motor vehicle drivers are most likely to give way to bicyclists when the bicycle crossing is next to a roundabout and least

likely to give way when it is situated on a link.



The conclusion is that there is a certain amount of drivers that do not obey the yielding rules and presumably rely on their larger mass and better protection. It is therefore very important that the road design allows for active interaction between the road user groups to get a more equal situation between motor vehicle drivers and bicyclists as well as safe and

secure bicycle crossings. Speed is obviously the key issue. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
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organization
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Contribution to conference
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subject
conference name
TRB's 3rd Urban Street Symposium
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e547dbe0-23be-43d1-bd34-2c040dc68335 (old id 1049461)
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http://www.urbanstreet.info/
date added to LUP
2008-03-19 12:12:26
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2016-04-16 10:42:01
@misc{e547dbe0-23be-43d1-bd34-2c040dc68335,
  abstract     = {The main purpose of this study was to learn more about how bicyclists and motor vehicle drivers in some Swedish cities interact at intersections and how the yielding rules, different intersection designs, vehicle flows and speed affect the behaviour.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Field studies were performed at 25 crossings for six hours each. Cycle crossings on links, at three- and four-armed intersections as well as at roundabouts were studied.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Preliminary results show that yielding rules are not enough to make road users behave as intended; even when there are yielding signs and markings before the bicycle crossing, 30% of the motor vehicle drivers do not yield to bicyclists. Fewer yield to bicyclists when motor vehicle speed is higher, when motor vehicle flow is larger and when bicycle flow is smaller. Speeds below 30 km/h seem to produce quite favourable conditions for an<br/><br>
interaction with a high degree of equity, efficiency and safety for both road users no matter whether car drivers have to yield according to the rules or not. Motor vehicle drivers are most likely to give way to bicyclists when the bicycle crossing is next to a roundabout and least<br/><br>
likely to give way when it is situated on a link.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The conclusion is that there is a certain amount of drivers that do not obey the yielding rules and presumably rely on their larger mass and better protection. It is therefore very important that the road design allows for active interaction between the road user groups to get a more equal situation between motor vehicle drivers and bicyclists as well as safe and<br/><br>
secure bicycle crossings. Speed is obviously the key issue.},
  author       = {Hydén, Christer and Svensson, Åse and Sakshaug, Lisa},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Yielding behaviour and interaction at bicycle crossings},
  year         = {2007},
}