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'Open-ended questions' and 'show-and-tell'--a way to improve pharmacist counselling and patients' handling of their medicines

Ekedahl, Anders LU (1996) In Journal of clinical pharmacy and therapeutics 21(2). p.9-95
Abstract
Pharmacists must ensure that patients know how to make the best use of their medication. An education programme was initiated in the southernmost part of Sweden during 1990 in order to improve the communication skills of pharmacy staff and the information given to customers. Customers with prescriptions for Turbuhaler were asked to 'show-and-tell' how they used their inhalers, and the results were documented. In April 1992, 53% of patients handled their Turbuhaler correctly. One year later a significantly higher proportion of the patients (67%) used their inhalers correctly. If patients are asked to 'show-and-tell' how they use their medication and how they interpret the information given, then errors in their handling of the medicines can... (More)
Pharmacists must ensure that patients know how to make the best use of their medication. An education programme was initiated in the southernmost part of Sweden during 1990 in order to improve the communication skills of pharmacy staff and the information given to customers. Customers with prescriptions for Turbuhaler were asked to 'show-and-tell' how they used their inhalers, and the results were documented. In April 1992, 53% of patients handled their Turbuhaler correctly. One year later a significantly higher proportion of the patients (67%) used their inhalers correctly. If patients are asked to 'show-and-tell' how they use their medication and how they interpret the information given, then errors in their handling of the medicines can be revealed. If advice on the proper use of drugs is given to individual patients, then mishandling is reduced. The study used an open design, so the conclusions drawn can only be tentative. However, the magnitude of the change observed suggests that the conclusions are valid. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of clinical pharmacy and therapeutics
volume
21
issue
2
pages
9 - 95
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0029998382
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
49be6e3f-b0a9-4b5b-a1f9-29d409ae001e (old id 1296351)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8809646
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2710.1996.tb00007.x/abstract
date added to LUP
2013-08-07 14:40:28
date last changed
2016-04-16 12:43:03
@misc{49be6e3f-b0a9-4b5b-a1f9-29d409ae001e,
  abstract     = {Pharmacists must ensure that patients know how to make the best use of their medication. An education programme was initiated in the southernmost part of Sweden during 1990 in order to improve the communication skills of pharmacy staff and the information given to customers. Customers with prescriptions for Turbuhaler were asked to 'show-and-tell' how they used their inhalers, and the results were documented. In April 1992, 53% of patients handled their Turbuhaler correctly. One year later a significantly higher proportion of the patients (67%) used their inhalers correctly. If patients are asked to 'show-and-tell' how they use their medication and how they interpret the information given, then errors in their handling of the medicines can be revealed. If advice on the proper use of drugs is given to individual patients, then mishandling is reduced. The study used an open design, so the conclusions drawn can only be tentative. However, the magnitude of the change observed suggests that the conclusions are valid.},
  author       = {Ekedahl, Anders},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {9--95},
  series       = {Journal of clinical pharmacy and therapeutics},
  title        = {'Open-ended questions' and 'show-and-tell'--a way to improve pharmacist counselling and patients' handling of their medicines},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {1996},
}