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Effects of luminal stimuli on polyamine metabolism in the small intestine of the rat : the role of enteric nerves

Jansson, M; Nilsson, B O LU ; Rosengren, E; Ekström, J. and Lundgren, O (1993) In Acta Physiol.Scand 149(4). p.483-90
Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent polyamine metabolism in the small intestine of the rat is controlled by the enteric nervous system. Polyamine metabolism was followed by measuring the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and in some instances also the content of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine). ODC activity in the intestine was increased when intraluminal pressure was increased and 3 h after placing cholera toxin in the intestinal lumen. Cholera toxin also increased the tissue putrescine content. Atropine or hexamethonium given i.v. did not influence the evoked changes of ODC activity. The pressure induced changes were not decreased by placing lidocaine on the serosal surface. On the other... (More)

The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent polyamine metabolism in the small intestine of the rat is controlled by the enteric nervous system. Polyamine metabolism was followed by measuring the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and in some instances also the content of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine). ODC activity in the intestine was increased when intraluminal pressure was increased and 3 h after placing cholera toxin in the intestinal lumen. Cholera toxin also increased the tissue putrescine content. Atropine or hexamethonium given i.v. did not influence the evoked changes of ODC activity. The pressure induced changes were not decreased by placing lidocaine on the serosal surface. On the other hand, the ODC activity of control segments were decreased by hexamethonium or atropine. The presence of glucose in the intestinal perfusate did not augment tissue ODC activity, neither did the heat stable enterotoxin from Escherichia coli (STa). It is concluded that the effect on polyamine metabolism evoked by luminal pressure or cholera toxin seems not to be mediated via nerves, while nerves seem to influence ODC activity during control conditions. The experiments with enterotoxins suggest that cAMP is the intracellular second messenger controlling intestinal ODC activity.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Animals, Cholera Toxin, Enteric Nervous System, Intestine, Small, Ornithine Decarboxylase, Polyamines, Pressure, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Time Factors
in
Acta Physiol.Scand
volume
149
issue
4
pages
8 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0027743487
ISSN
0001-6772
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1716.1993.tb09646.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
12f2f869-b177-47dd-a6ec-83b8eeece8fb
date added to LUP
2016-06-17 16:43:31
date last changed
2016-08-02 15:55:43
@misc{12f2f869-b177-47dd-a6ec-83b8eeece8fb,
  abstract     = {<p>The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent polyamine metabolism in the small intestine of the rat is controlled by the enteric nervous system. Polyamine metabolism was followed by measuring the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and in some instances also the content of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine). ODC activity in the intestine was increased when intraluminal pressure was increased and 3 h after placing cholera toxin in the intestinal lumen. Cholera toxin also increased the tissue putrescine content. Atropine or hexamethonium given i.v. did not influence the evoked changes of ODC activity. The pressure induced changes were not decreased by placing lidocaine on the serosal surface. On the other hand, the ODC activity of control segments were decreased by hexamethonium or atropine. The presence of glucose in the intestinal perfusate did not augment tissue ODC activity, neither did the heat stable enterotoxin from Escherichia coli (STa). It is concluded that the effect on polyamine metabolism evoked by luminal pressure or cholera toxin seems not to be mediated via nerves, while nerves seem to influence ODC activity during control conditions. The experiments with enterotoxins suggest that cAMP is the intracellular second messenger controlling intestinal ODC activity.</p>},
  author       = {Jansson, M and Nilsson, B O and Rosengren, E and Ekström, J. and Lundgren, O},
  issn         = {0001-6772},
  keyword      = {Animals,Cholera Toxin,Enteric Nervous System,Intestine, Small,Ornithine Decarboxylase,Polyamines,Pressure,Rats,Rats, Sprague-Dawley,Time Factors},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {483--90},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa83d7d0)},
  series       = {Acta Physiol.Scand},
  title        = {Effects of luminal stimuli on polyamine metabolism in the small intestine of the rat : the role of enteric nerves},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-1716.1993.tb09646.x},
  volume       = {149},
  year         = {1993},
}