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The IAU 2000 Resolutions for Astrometry, Celestial Mechanics, and Metrology in the Relativistic Framework: Explanatory Supplement

Soffel, M.; Klioner, S. A.; Petit, G.; Wolf, P.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Bretagnon, P.; Brumberg, V. A.; Capitaine, N.; Damour, T. and Fukushima, T., et al. (2003) In Astrophysical Journal 126(6). p.2687-2706
Abstract
We discuss the IAU resolutions B1.3, B1.4, B1.5, and B1.9 that wereadopted during the 24th General Assembly in Manchester, 2000, andprovides details on and explanations for these resolutions. It isexplained why they present significant progress over the correspondingIAU 1991 resolutions and why they are necessary in the light of presentaccuracies in astrometry, celestial mechanics, and metrology. In fact,most of these resolutions are consistent with astronomical models andsoftware already in use. The metric tensors and gravitational potentialsof both the Barycentric Celestial Reference System and the GeocentricCelestial Reference System are defined and discussed. The necessity andrelevance of the two celestial reference systems are... (More)
We discuss the IAU resolutions B1.3, B1.4, B1.5, and B1.9 that wereadopted during the 24th General Assembly in Manchester, 2000, andprovides details on and explanations for these resolutions. It isexplained why they present significant progress over the correspondingIAU 1991 resolutions and why they are necessary in the light of presentaccuracies in astrometry, celestial mechanics, and metrology. In fact,most of these resolutions are consistent with astronomical models andsoftware already in use. The metric tensors and gravitational potentialsof both the Barycentric Celestial Reference System and the GeocentricCelestial Reference System are defined and discussed. The necessity andrelevance of the two celestial reference systems are explained. Thetransformations of coordinates and gravitational potentials arediscussed. Potential coefficients parameterizing the post-Newtoniangravitational potentials are expounded. Simplified versions of the timetransformations suitable for modern clock accuracies are elucidated.Various approximations used in the resolutions are explicated andjustified. Some models (e.g., for higher spin moments) that serve thepurpose of estimating orders of magnitude have actually never beenpublished before. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Astrometry, Celestial Mechanics, Time, Reference Systems
in
Astrophysical Journal
volume
126
issue
6
pages
2687 - 2706
publisher
University of Chicago Press
external identifiers
  • WOS:000187725500009
  • Scopus:0242375906
ISSN
0004-637X
DOI
10.1086/378162
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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cf6cb63e-7184-454f-9e56-a185585b45cd (old id 130419)
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2007-07-20 13:00:24
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2016-12-04 04:42:21
@misc{cf6cb63e-7184-454f-9e56-a185585b45cd,
  abstract     = {We discuss the IAU resolutions B1.3, B1.4, B1.5, and B1.9 that wereadopted during the 24th General Assembly in Manchester, 2000, andprovides details on and explanations for these resolutions. It isexplained why they present significant progress over the correspondingIAU 1991 resolutions and why they are necessary in the light of presentaccuracies in astrometry, celestial mechanics, and metrology. In fact,most of these resolutions are consistent with astronomical models andsoftware already in use. The metric tensors and gravitational potentialsof both the Barycentric Celestial Reference System and the GeocentricCelestial Reference System are defined and discussed. The necessity andrelevance of the two celestial reference systems are explained. Thetransformations of coordinates and gravitational potentials arediscussed. Potential coefficients parameterizing the post-Newtoniangravitational potentials are expounded. Simplified versions of the timetransformations suitable for modern clock accuracies are elucidated.Various approximations used in the resolutions are explicated andjustified. Some models (e.g., for higher spin moments) that serve thepurpose of estimating orders of magnitude have actually never beenpublished before.},
  author       = {Soffel, M. and Klioner, S. A. and Petit, G. and Wolf, P. and Kopeikin, S. M. and Bretagnon, P. and Brumberg, V. A. and Capitaine, N. and Damour, T. and Fukushima, T. and Guinot, B. and Huang, T.-Y. and Lindegren, Lennart and Ma, C. and Nordtvedt, K. and Ries, J. C. and Seidelmann, P. K. and Vokrouhlický, D. and Will, C. M. and Xu, C.},
  issn         = {0004-637X},
  keyword      = {Astrometry,Celestial Mechanics,Time,Reference Systems},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {2687--2706},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xbb650c0)},
  series       = {Astrophysical Journal},
  title        = {The IAU 2000 Resolutions for Astrometry, Celestial Mechanics, and Metrology in the Relativistic Framework: Explanatory Supplement},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/378162},
  volume       = {126},
  year         = {2003},
}