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Negative-pressure wound therapy using gauze or open-cell polyurethane foam: similar early effects on pressure transduction and tissue contraction in an experimental porcine wound model.

Malmsjö, Malin LU ; Ingemansson, Richard LU ; Martin, Robin and Huddleston, Elizabeth (2009) In Wound repair and regeneration : official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society 17(2). p.200-205
Abstract
Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), also known as topical negative-pressure therapy, is widely used to manage wounds and accelerate healing. NPWT has so far been delivered mainly via open-cell polyurethane foam, but increasing interest has been directed toward delivering NPWT via gauze. In the present study, the early effects of NPWT on pressure transduction and wound contraction were examined in wounds filled with either polyurethane foam or gauze. An experimental setup of a porcine wound model was used, in which the animals were anesthetized for 12-14 hours. Negative pressures between -50 and -175 mmHg were applied in -25 mmHg increments. Wound bed pressure was measured using a saline filled catheter sutured to the bottom of the... (More)
Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), also known as topical negative-pressure therapy, is widely used to manage wounds and accelerate healing. NPWT has so far been delivered mainly via open-cell polyurethane foam, but increasing interest has been directed toward delivering NPWT via gauze. In the present study, the early effects of NPWT on pressure transduction and wound contraction were examined in wounds filled with either polyurethane foam or gauze. An experimental setup of a porcine wound model was used, in which the animals were anesthetized for 12-14 hours. Negative pressures between -50 and -175 mmHg were applied in -25 mmHg increments. Wound bed pressure was measured using a saline filled catheter sutured to the bottom of the wound. The contraction of the wound edges was also determined. The recordings were performed upon reaching steady state, which typically occurred within 1 minute. For both fillers, wound bed negative pressure increased linearly with delivered vacuum with little deviation from set pressure (correlation coefficient 0.99 in both cases). Similar tissue contraction was observed when using foam and gauze. The most prominent contraction was observed in the range of 0 to -50 mmHg with greater vacuum only producing minor further movement of the wound edge. In conclusion, the present experimental study shows that gauze and foam are equally effective at delivering negative pressure and creating mechanical deformation of the wound. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Wound repair and regeneration : official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society
volume
17
issue
2
pages
200 - 205
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • WOS:000264188600008
  • PMID:19320888
  • Scopus:62449246737
ISSN
1524-475X
DOI
10.1111/j.1524-475X.2009.00461.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
69ce10e0-ad3e-416d-a365-ebd998d58bb4 (old id 1367462)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19320888?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-04-06 15:32:57
date last changed
2016-10-28 15:18:39
@misc{69ce10e0-ad3e-416d-a365-ebd998d58bb4,
  abstract     = {Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), also known as topical negative-pressure therapy, is widely used to manage wounds and accelerate healing. NPWT has so far been delivered mainly via open-cell polyurethane foam, but increasing interest has been directed toward delivering NPWT via gauze. In the present study, the early effects of NPWT on pressure transduction and wound contraction were examined in wounds filled with either polyurethane foam or gauze. An experimental setup of a porcine wound model was used, in which the animals were anesthetized for 12-14 hours. Negative pressures between -50 and -175 mmHg were applied in -25 mmHg increments. Wound bed pressure was measured using a saline filled catheter sutured to the bottom of the wound. The contraction of the wound edges was also determined. The recordings were performed upon reaching steady state, which typically occurred within 1 minute. For both fillers, wound bed negative pressure increased linearly with delivered vacuum with little deviation from set pressure (correlation coefficient 0.99 in both cases). Similar tissue contraction was observed when using foam and gauze. The most prominent contraction was observed in the range of 0 to -50 mmHg with greater vacuum only producing minor further movement of the wound edge. In conclusion, the present experimental study shows that gauze and foam are equally effective at delivering negative pressure and creating mechanical deformation of the wound.},
  author       = {Malmsjö, Malin and Ingemansson, Richard and Martin, Robin and Huddleston, Elizabeth},
  issn         = {1524-475X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {200--205},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8ea00a0)},
  series       = {Wound repair and regeneration : official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society},
  title        = {Negative-pressure wound therapy using gauze or open-cell polyurethane foam: similar early effects on pressure transduction and tissue contraction in an experimental porcine wound model.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1524-475X.2009.00461.x},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2009},
}