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When and Why Did Sweden Lag Behind? 'Eurosclerosis' Revisited

Ljungberg, Jonas LU (2005) Annual Conference on European Integration, organized by the Swedish Network for European Studies in Economics and Business (SNEE), 2005
Abstract
The conventional view is that Sweden transformed its economy and institutions more slowly than other countries after the structural crisis of the late 1970s, and this is held as an explanation for Sweden’s poor economic growth thereafter. This paper questions that view in several aspects. First, it points out that Sweden has performed comparatively well since the end of the EMS crisis. Second, Swedish and European economic growth is put in a perspective of convergence over the whole twentieth century. Third, the paper highlights cases where Swedish transformation of industry and institutions were swifter than in other Western European countries. Fourth, it suggests that the Solow Productivity Paradox gives a key to an explanation that... (More)
The conventional view is that Sweden transformed its economy and institutions more slowly than other countries after the structural crisis of the late 1970s, and this is held as an explanation for Sweden’s poor economic growth thereafter. This paper questions that view in several aspects. First, it points out that Sweden has performed comparatively well since the end of the EMS crisis. Second, Swedish and European economic growth is put in a perspective of convergence over the whole twentieth century. Third, the paper highlights cases where Swedish transformation of industry and institutions were swifter than in other Western European countries. Fourth, it suggests that the Solow Productivity Paradox gives a key to an explanation that comprises both the slow-down 1975-93, and the recovery of growth since 1994. Fifth, the paper discusses that explanation in the framework of a shift-share analysis of structural change and productivity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
economic growth, labour productivity, structural change, industrial policy, labour market
conference name
Annual Conference on European Integration, organized by the Swedish Network for European Studies in Economics and Business (SNEE), 2005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e50b77ea-cf2b-408e-86b3-4face4d8acc8 (old id 1386835)
date added to LUP
2009-04-20 12:27:23
date last changed
2016-04-16 11:39:30
@misc{e50b77ea-cf2b-408e-86b3-4face4d8acc8,
  abstract     = {The conventional view is that Sweden transformed its economy and institutions more slowly than other countries after the structural crisis of the late 1970s, and this is held as an explanation for Sweden’s poor economic growth thereafter. This paper questions that view in several aspects. First, it points out that Sweden has performed comparatively well since the end of the EMS crisis. Second, Swedish and European economic growth is put in a perspective of convergence over the whole twentieth century. Third, the paper highlights cases where Swedish transformation of industry and institutions were swifter than in other Western European countries. Fourth, it suggests that the Solow Productivity Paradox gives a key to an explanation that comprises both the slow-down 1975-93, and the recovery of growth since 1994. Fifth, the paper discusses that explanation in the framework of a shift-share analysis of structural change and productivity.},
  author       = {Ljungberg, Jonas},
  keyword      = {economic growth,labour productivity,structural change,industrial policy,labour market},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {When and Why Did Sweden Lag Behind? 'Eurosclerosis' Revisited},
  year         = {2005},
}