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Low Serum Testosterone and Estradiol Predict Mortality in Elderly Men.

Tivesten, Asa; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Labrie, Fernand; Karlsson, Magnus LU ; Ljunggren, Osten; Mellström, Dan and Ohlsson, Claes (2009) In The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism 94. p.2482-2488
Abstract
Context: Age-related reduction of serum testosterone may contribute to the signs and symptoms of aging, but previous studies report conflicting evidence about testosterone levels and male mortality. No large prospective cohort study has determined a possible association between serum estradiol and mortality in men. Objective: The main objective was to examine the association between serum testosterone and estradiol and all-cause mortality in elderly men. Design, setting and participants: We used specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze serum sex steroids at baseline in older men who participated in the prospective population-based MrOS Sweden cohort (n=3,014, mean 75 years of age, range 69-80). Main outcome measure:... (More)
Context: Age-related reduction of serum testosterone may contribute to the signs and symptoms of aging, but previous studies report conflicting evidence about testosterone levels and male mortality. No large prospective cohort study has determined a possible association between serum estradiol and mortality in men. Objective: The main objective was to examine the association between serum testosterone and estradiol and all-cause mortality in elderly men. Design, setting and participants: We used specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze serum sex steroids at baseline in older men who participated in the prospective population-based MrOS Sweden cohort (n=3,014, mean 75 years of age, range 69-80). Main outcome measure: All-cause mortality by serum testosterone and estradiol levels. Results: During a mean follow-up period of 4.5 years, 383 deaths occurred. In multivariate hazards regression models, low levels (within quartile 1; versus quartiles 2-4) of both testosterone (hazard ratio [HR] 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-2.12) and estradiol (HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.22-1.95) associated with mortality. A model including both hormones showed that both low testosterone (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.11-1.92) and estradiol (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.02-1.73) predicted mortality. Risk of death nearly doubled (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.46-2.62) in subjects with low levels of both testosterone and estradiol compared with subjects within quartiles 2-4 of both hormones. Conclusions: Elderly men with low serum testosterone and estradiol have increased risk of mortality, and subjects with low values of both testosterone and estradiol have the highest risk of mortality. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
volume
94
pages
2482 - 2488
publisher
The Endocrine Society
external identifiers
  • WOS:000267767500043
  • PMID:19401373
  • Scopus:67650248724
ISSN
1945-7197
DOI
10.1210/jc.2008-2650
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4eb72879-7447-46f5-a126-147de279a5e2 (old id 1391780)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19401373?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-05-06 12:53:35
date last changed
2016-11-20 04:24:16
@misc{4eb72879-7447-46f5-a126-147de279a5e2,
  abstract     = {Context: Age-related reduction of serum testosterone may contribute to the signs and symptoms of aging, but previous studies report conflicting evidence about testosterone levels and male mortality. No large prospective cohort study has determined a possible association between serum estradiol and mortality in men. Objective: The main objective was to examine the association between serum testosterone and estradiol and all-cause mortality in elderly men. Design, setting and participants: We used specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze serum sex steroids at baseline in older men who participated in the prospective population-based MrOS Sweden cohort (n=3,014, mean 75 years of age, range 69-80). Main outcome measure: All-cause mortality by serum testosterone and estradiol levels. Results: During a mean follow-up period of 4.5 years, 383 deaths occurred. In multivariate hazards regression models, low levels (within quartile 1; versus quartiles 2-4) of both testosterone (hazard ratio [HR] 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-2.12) and estradiol (HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.22-1.95) associated with mortality. A model including both hormones showed that both low testosterone (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.11-1.92) and estradiol (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.02-1.73) predicted mortality. Risk of death nearly doubled (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.46-2.62) in subjects with low levels of both testosterone and estradiol compared with subjects within quartiles 2-4 of both hormones. Conclusions: Elderly men with low serum testosterone and estradiol have increased risk of mortality, and subjects with low values of both testosterone and estradiol have the highest risk of mortality.},
  author       = {Tivesten, Asa and Vandenput, Liesbeth and Labrie, Fernand and Karlsson, Magnus and Ljunggren, Osten and Mellström, Dan and Ohlsson, Claes},
  issn         = {1945-7197},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {2482--2488},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa2f84f8)},
  series       = {The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism},
  title        = {Low Serum Testosterone and Estradiol Predict Mortality in Elderly Men.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2008-2650},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2009},
}