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Virulence mechanisms of Moraxella in the pathogenesis of infection.

Perez Vidakovics, Laura LU and Riesbeck, Kristian LU (2009) In Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases 22(3). p.279-285
Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Moraxella catarrhalis is an emerging human-specific pathogen responsible for upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Understanding the events in the complex pathogenesis and underlying mechanisms during M. catarrhalis infection is a key to the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines. RECENT FINDINGS: Several novel findings have been reported on Moraxella pathogenesis and, in parts, explain how the species stands as a commensal in preschool children and survives in the host. Molecular structures for different adhesins in addition to target ligands with respect to signalling and invasion have been defined. Evasion of the complement system allows Moraxella to survive in the mucosa and by neutralizing... (More)
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Moraxella catarrhalis is an emerging human-specific pathogen responsible for upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Understanding the events in the complex pathogenesis and underlying mechanisms during M. catarrhalis infection is a key to the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines. RECENT FINDINGS: Several novel findings have been reported on Moraxella pathogenesis and, in parts, explain how the species stands as a commensal in preschool children and survives in the host. Molecular structures for different adhesins in addition to target ligands with respect to signalling and invasion have been defined. Evasion of the complement system allows Moraxella to survive in the mucosa and by neutralizing [alpha]1-antichymotrypsin the protease activity is increased, resulting in tissue destruction and thus promotion of bacterial attachment. Moraxella-dependent cell activation via immunoglobulin D in addition to toll-like receptors and specific epithelial cell inhibition by cross-linking of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 in the early innate immune response and, finally, the ability of M. catarrhalis to form biofilms are other specific research areas of interest. SUMMARY: Recent advances have allowed a more detailed picture of the processes involved in bacteria-host cell interactions, the cause of inflammatory processes and specific host defense responses against the intriguing species Moraxella. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Virulence Factors: physiology, Respiratory Tract Infections: microbiology, Moraxellaceae Infections: microbiology, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis: pathogenicity, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis: immunology, Bacterial Proteins: physiology, Biomedical Research: trends
in
Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases
volume
22
issue
3
pages
279 - 285
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • WOS:000265954900011
  • PMID:19405217
  • Scopus:65549167704
ISSN
1473-6527
DOI
10.1097/QCO.0b013e3283298e4e
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bfba52d1-4cea-48d3-8f35-aa0016084c14 (old id 1412821)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19405217?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-06-01 09:09:22
date last changed
2016-11-17 14:02:20
@misc{bfba52d1-4cea-48d3-8f35-aa0016084c14,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Moraxella catarrhalis is an emerging human-specific pathogen responsible for upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Understanding the events in the complex pathogenesis and underlying mechanisms during M. catarrhalis infection is a key to the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines. RECENT FINDINGS: Several novel findings have been reported on Moraxella pathogenesis and, in parts, explain how the species stands as a commensal in preschool children and survives in the host. Molecular structures for different adhesins in addition to target ligands with respect to signalling and invasion have been defined. Evasion of the complement system allows Moraxella to survive in the mucosa and by neutralizing [alpha]1-antichymotrypsin the protease activity is increased, resulting in tissue destruction and thus promotion of bacterial attachment. Moraxella-dependent cell activation via immunoglobulin D in addition to toll-like receptors and specific epithelial cell inhibition by cross-linking of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 in the early innate immune response and, finally, the ability of M. catarrhalis to form biofilms are other specific research areas of interest. SUMMARY: Recent advances have allowed a more detailed picture of the processes involved in bacteria-host cell interactions, the cause of inflammatory processes and specific host defense responses against the intriguing species Moraxella.},
  author       = {Perez Vidakovics, Laura and Riesbeck, Kristian},
  issn         = {1473-6527},
  keyword      = {Virulence Factors: physiology,Respiratory Tract Infections: microbiology,Moraxellaceae Infections: microbiology,Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis: pathogenicity,Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis: immunology,Bacterial Proteins: physiology,Biomedical Research: trends},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {279--285},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x90507c8)},
  series       = {Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Virulence mechanisms of Moraxella in the pathogenesis of infection.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/QCO.0b013e3283298e4e},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2009},
}