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The relation between urinary incontinence and steroid hormone levels in perimenopausal women. A report from the Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) study.

Teleman, Pia LU ; Persson, Jan LU ; Mattiasson, Anders LU and Samsioe, Göran LU (2009) In Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 88(8). p.927-932
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To outline possible associations between urinary incontinence (UI) and serum levels of steroid hormones in middle-aged women. DESIGN AND SETTING: Community-based observational study. SAMPLE: All women aged 50-59 living in the Lund area by December 1995 were invited to a screening procedure. Sixty-four percent (n = 6,917) attended the screening that included physical and laboratory examinations and questionnaires. METHODS: Serum levels of cortisol, testosterone, androstendione, SHBG (sex hormone-binding globulin), and estradiol were analyzed and the 2,221 (32%) women who reported urinary leakage causing a social or hygienic problem were compared to those who denied incontinence. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Possible differences in serum... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To outline possible associations between urinary incontinence (UI) and serum levels of steroid hormones in middle-aged women. DESIGN AND SETTING: Community-based observational study. SAMPLE: All women aged 50-59 living in the Lund area by December 1995 were invited to a screening procedure. Sixty-four percent (n = 6,917) attended the screening that included physical and laboratory examinations and questionnaires. METHODS: Serum levels of cortisol, testosterone, androstendione, SHBG (sex hormone-binding globulin), and estradiol were analyzed and the 2,221 (32%) women who reported urinary leakage causing a social or hygienic problem were compared to those who denied incontinence. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Possible differences in serum levels of steroid hormones in continent and incontinent women. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between continent and incontinent women regarding serum levels of cortisol, testosterone, androstendione, or testosterone + androstendione combined. Serum estradiol adjusted for body mass index, parity, smoking, and hysterectomy was significantly higher in incontinent women (87.1 +/- 138.4 pmol/l vs. 78.0 +/- 118.5 pmol/l, p = 0.005), whereas the ratio estradiol/SHBG was not. These differences persisted when the group of women not on hormonal treatment was analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: UI in middle-aged women seems related to higher serum estradiol levels. This corroborates with studies showing a higher incidence and/or prevalence of UI in women on hormone therapy. No association between UI and serum levels of cortisol, testosterone, or androstendione was found. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
volume
88
issue
8
pages
927 - 932
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • WOS:000269097500011
  • PMID:19579140
  • Scopus:68249158534
ISSN
1600-0412
DOI
10.1080/00016340903117986
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
86f1f6ef-a92d-45ed-9d60-a1a61e63d88b (old id 1453386)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19579140?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-08-04 10:24:49
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:27:16
@misc{86f1f6ef-a92d-45ed-9d60-a1a61e63d88b,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To outline possible associations between urinary incontinence (UI) and serum levels of steroid hormones in middle-aged women. DESIGN AND SETTING: Community-based observational study. SAMPLE: All women aged 50-59 living in the Lund area by December 1995 were invited to a screening procedure. Sixty-four percent (n = 6,917) attended the screening that included physical and laboratory examinations and questionnaires. METHODS: Serum levels of cortisol, testosterone, androstendione, SHBG (sex hormone-binding globulin), and estradiol were analyzed and the 2,221 (32%) women who reported urinary leakage causing a social or hygienic problem were compared to those who denied incontinence. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Possible differences in serum levels of steroid hormones in continent and incontinent women. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between continent and incontinent women regarding serum levels of cortisol, testosterone, androstendione, or testosterone + androstendione combined. Serum estradiol adjusted for body mass index, parity, smoking, and hysterectomy was significantly higher in incontinent women (87.1 +/- 138.4 pmol/l vs. 78.0 +/- 118.5 pmol/l, p = 0.005), whereas the ratio estradiol/SHBG was not. These differences persisted when the group of women not on hormonal treatment was analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: UI in middle-aged women seems related to higher serum estradiol levels. This corroborates with studies showing a higher incidence and/or prevalence of UI in women on hormone therapy. No association between UI and serum levels of cortisol, testosterone, or androstendione was found.},
  author       = {Teleman, Pia and Persson, Jan and Mattiasson, Anders and Samsioe, Göran},
  issn         = {1600-0412},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {927--932},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa427d70)},
  series       = {Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {The relation between urinary incontinence and steroid hormone levels in perimenopausal women. A report from the Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016340903117986},
  volume       = {88},
  year         = {2009},
}