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Supply chain design and coordination in humanitarian logistics through clusters

Jahre, Marianne LU and Jensen, Leif-Magnus (2009) 21th Annual NOFOMA Conference, 2009
Abstract
Purpose of this paper:

The cluster thinking in the humanitarian world has been suggested as a solution to the lack

of coordinated disaster response in the past 10 years. Clusters on diverse functions

including sheltering, logistics and water sanitation can be viewed as an effort of functional

coordination, i.e. horizontal coordination within a functional area. The purpose of this

paper is to contribute to more understanding of the cluster concept’s potential effects for

vertical, i.e. supply chain coordination as well as coordination between clusters.

Design/methodology/approach:

The cluster concept and some main empirical issues are presented based on a set... (More)
Purpose of this paper:

The cluster thinking in the humanitarian world has been suggested as a solution to the lack

of coordinated disaster response in the past 10 years. Clusters on diverse functions

including sheltering, logistics and water sanitation can be viewed as an effort of functional

coordination, i.e. horizontal coordination within a functional area. The purpose of this

paper is to contribute to more understanding of the cluster concept’s potential effects for

vertical, i.e. supply chain coordination as well as coordination between clusters.

Design/methodology/approach:

The cluster concept and some main empirical issues are presented based on a set of

interviews and secondary materials. Literature on clusters and coordination is used to

develop a theoretical framework with propositions concerning what potentially negative

effects and increased focus on horizontal coordination may have for a supply chain

oriented approach.

Findings:

Results provide important reflections concerning one of the major trends in today’s

development of humanitarian logistics. Coordination in one dimension may have negative

impacts from other viewpoints.

Research limitations/implications

More in-depth case studies of experiences with clusters in various operations are needed.

Care should be taken in applying various perspectives including the field, humanitarian

organizations, beneficiaries, donors, private logistics service providers and during

(response) as well as between disasters (preparedness).

Practical implications:

Results provide important reflections concerning one of the major trends in today’s

development of humanitarian logistics.

What is original/value of paper?

Focusing on the possible trade-offs between different types of coordination is an important

complement to the literature which often assumes a high degree of both horizontal and

vertical coordination. This is a general challenge which is well illustrated in the

humanitarian context. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
humanitarian logistics, disaster management, Supply chain design, coordination, cluster.
pages
16 pages
conference name
21th Annual NOFOMA Conference, 2009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9610e8f5-3cf7-4d7c-96df-492293a90ab4 (old id 1480187)
date added to LUP
2009-09-29 09:07:02
date last changed
2016-07-13 13:15:32
@misc{9610e8f5-3cf7-4d7c-96df-492293a90ab4,
  abstract     = {Purpose of this paper:<br/><br>
The cluster thinking in the humanitarian world has been suggested as a solution to the lack<br/><br>
of coordinated disaster response in the past 10 years. Clusters on diverse functions<br/><br>
including sheltering, logistics and water sanitation can be viewed as an effort of functional<br/><br>
coordination, i.e. horizontal coordination within a functional area. The purpose of this<br/><br>
paper is to contribute to more understanding of the cluster concept’s potential effects for<br/><br>
vertical, i.e. supply chain coordination as well as coordination between clusters.<br/><br>
Design/methodology/approach:<br/><br>
The cluster concept and some main empirical issues are presented based on a set of<br/><br>
interviews and secondary materials. Literature on clusters and coordination is used to<br/><br>
develop a theoretical framework with propositions concerning what potentially negative<br/><br>
effects and increased focus on horizontal coordination may have for a supply chain<br/><br>
oriented approach.<br/><br>
Findings:<br/><br>
Results provide important reflections concerning one of the major trends in today’s<br/><br>
development of humanitarian logistics. Coordination in one dimension may have negative<br/><br>
impacts from other viewpoints.<br/><br>
Research limitations/implications<br/><br>
More in-depth case studies of experiences with clusters in various operations are needed.<br/><br>
Care should be taken in applying various perspectives including the field, humanitarian<br/><br>
organizations, beneficiaries, donors, private logistics service providers and during<br/><br>
(response) as well as between disasters (preparedness).<br/><br>
Practical implications:<br/><br>
Results provide important reflections concerning one of the major trends in today’s<br/><br>
development of humanitarian logistics.<br/><br>
What is original/value of paper?<br/><br>
Focusing on the possible trade-offs between different types of coordination is an important<br/><br>
complement to the literature which often assumes a high degree of both horizontal and<br/><br>
vertical coordination. This is a general challenge which is well illustrated in the<br/><br>
humanitarian context.},
  author       = {Jahre, Marianne and Jensen, Leif-Magnus},
  keyword      = {humanitarian
logistics,disaster management,Supply chain design,coordination,cluster.},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {16},
  title        = {Supply chain design and coordination in humanitarian logistics through clusters},
  year         = {2009},
}