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Three-Year Survival and Stroke Recurrence Rates in Patients With Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

Zia, Elisabet LU ; Engström, Gunnar LU ; Svensson, Peter LU ; Norrving, Bo LU and Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène LU (2009) In Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation 40. p.3567-3573
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There are few studies on the prognosis after primary intracerebral hemorrhages, and they reported big differences in mortality rates. Our aim was to evaluate mortality and stroke recurrence rates in relation to hemorrhage characteristics, demographic and clinical factors, in a large unselected patient cohort. METHODS: We analyzed consecutive cases of first-ever primary intracerebral hemorrhages from 1993 to 2000 in a prospective stroke register covering the Malmö region, Sweden (population approximately 250 000). Mortality rates during 28 days and 3 years of follow-up and recurrence rates were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 474 cases were identified (46% women). In patients <75 years of age, 20% of the women and... (More)
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There are few studies on the prognosis after primary intracerebral hemorrhages, and they reported big differences in mortality rates. Our aim was to evaluate mortality and stroke recurrence rates in relation to hemorrhage characteristics, demographic and clinical factors, in a large unselected patient cohort. METHODS: We analyzed consecutive cases of first-ever primary intracerebral hemorrhages from 1993 to 2000 in a prospective stroke register covering the Malmö region, Sweden (population approximately 250 000). Mortality rates during 28 days and 3 years of follow-up and recurrence rates were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 474 cases were identified (46% women). In patients <75 years of age, 20% of the women and 23% of the men died within 28 days (P=0.38). The corresponding figures in patients >/=75 years were 26% and 41%, respectively (P=0.02). Male sex was an independent risk factor both for 28-day (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.008 to 2.2) and 3-year mortality (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.3). Other independent predictors of death were high age, central and brain stem hemorrhage location, intraventricular hemorrhage, increased volume, and decreased consciousness level. The recurrence rate was 5.1 per 100 person-years, 2.3 per 100 person-years for intracerebral hemorrhage and 2.8 per 100 person-years for cerebral infarction. Only age >65 years was significantly related to recurrent stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Women had better survival than men after primary intracerebral hemorrhages. The difference is largely explained by a higher 28-day mortality in male patients >75 years. However, the underlying reasons are yet to be explored. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation
volume
40
pages
3567 - 3573
publisher
American Heart Association
external identifiers
  • WOS:000271160300027
  • PMID:19729603
  • Scopus:70350540901
ISSN
1524-4628
DOI
10.1161/STROKEAHA.109.556324
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
573d540c-0d1f-471e-a83c-4334f1983ff8 (old id 1483841)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19729603?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-10-06 08:23:55
date last changed
2016-10-30 04:34:10
@misc{573d540c-0d1f-471e-a83c-4334f1983ff8,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There are few studies on the prognosis after primary intracerebral hemorrhages, and they reported big differences in mortality rates. Our aim was to evaluate mortality and stroke recurrence rates in relation to hemorrhage characteristics, demographic and clinical factors, in a large unselected patient cohort. METHODS: We analyzed consecutive cases of first-ever primary intracerebral hemorrhages from 1993 to 2000 in a prospective stroke register covering the Malmö region, Sweden (population approximately 250 000). Mortality rates during 28 days and 3 years of follow-up and recurrence rates were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 474 cases were identified (46% women). In patients &lt;75 years of age, 20% of the women and 23% of the men died within 28 days (P=0.38). The corresponding figures in patients &gt;/=75 years were 26% and 41%, respectively (P=0.02). Male sex was an independent risk factor both for 28-day (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.008 to 2.2) and 3-year mortality (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.3). Other independent predictors of death were high age, central and brain stem hemorrhage location, intraventricular hemorrhage, increased volume, and decreased consciousness level. The recurrence rate was 5.1 per 100 person-years, 2.3 per 100 person-years for intracerebral hemorrhage and 2.8 per 100 person-years for cerebral infarction. Only age &gt;65 years was significantly related to recurrent stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Women had better survival than men after primary intracerebral hemorrhages. The difference is largely explained by a higher 28-day mortality in male patients &gt;75 years. However, the underlying reasons are yet to be explored.},
  author       = {Zia, Elisabet and Engström, Gunnar and Svensson, Peter and Norrving, Bo and Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène},
  issn         = {1524-4628},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {3567--3573},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa36ebc8)},
  series       = {Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation},
  title        = {Three-Year Survival and Stroke Recurrence Rates in Patients With Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.109.556324},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2009},
}