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Curve length, curve form, and location of lower-end vertebra as a means of identifying the type of scoliosis.

Abul-Kasim, Kasim and Ohlin, Acke LU (2010) In Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery 18(1). p.1-5
Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine if the curve length, curve form, and location of the lower-end vertebra can identify the type of scoliosis. METHODS: Standing posteroanterior and lateral radiographs of 78 women and 27 men with scoliosis aged 8 to 32 years were retrospectively analysed. Parameters measured were (1) the curve length (the number of vertebrae in the main curve), (2) the curve form (C-form, inverted C-form, or S-form), (3) the curve apex (the vertebral body at the apex of each curve), (4) the site of the scoliosis (thoracic, thoracolumbar, or lumbar), and (5) the location of the lower-end vertebra. RESULTS: Only 3 (4%) of 77 patients with idiopathic scoliosis had a curve length of >8 vertebrae, compared with 19 (90%) of 21 patients... (More)
PURPOSE: To determine if the curve length, curve form, and location of the lower-end vertebra can identify the type of scoliosis. METHODS: Standing posteroanterior and lateral radiographs of 78 women and 27 men with scoliosis aged 8 to 32 years were retrospectively analysed. Parameters measured were (1) the curve length (the number of vertebrae in the main curve), (2) the curve form (C-form, inverted C-form, or S-form), (3) the curve apex (the vertebral body at the apex of each curve), (4) the site of the scoliosis (thoracic, thoracolumbar, or lumbar), and (5) the location of the lower-end vertebra. RESULTS: Only 3 (4%) of 77 patients with idiopathic scoliosis had a curve length of >8 vertebrae, compared with 19 (90%) of 21 patients with neuromuscular/neuropathic scoliosis (p<0.001, Fisher's exact test). 14 (18%) of the patients with idiopathic scoliosis had an S-form curve, compared with none in those with neuromuscular/neuropathic or congenital/osteogenic scoliosis (p=0.035, Fisher's exact test). No patient with idiopathic scoliosis had the lower- end vertebra located at L5, compared with 8 (38%) patients with neuromuscular scoliosis (p<0.001, Fisher's exact test). The criteria for neuromuscular/neuropathic scoliosis (a curve length of >8 vertebrae, a C-form or inverted C-form curve, and a lower-end vertebra located at L4 or L5) had 81% specificity, 76% sensitivity, 100% positive and 93% negative predictive values. CONCLUSION: These criteria may help identify patients with neuromuscular/neuropathic scoliosis for further investigation by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography before they undergo corrective surgery. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery
volume
18
issue
1
pages
1 - 5
publisher
Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press
external identifiers
  • PMID:20427824
  • Scopus:77955492016
ISSN
1022-5536
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8f6c513b-eea6-42b9-8661-597868853b73 (old id 1594699)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20427824?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-05-04 23:09:35
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:23:39
@misc{8f6c513b-eea6-42b9-8661-597868853b73,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: To determine if the curve length, curve form, and location of the lower-end vertebra can identify the type of scoliosis. METHODS: Standing posteroanterior and lateral radiographs of 78 women and 27 men with scoliosis aged 8 to 32 years were retrospectively analysed. Parameters measured were (1) the curve length (the number of vertebrae in the main curve), (2) the curve form (C-form, inverted C-form, or S-form), (3) the curve apex (the vertebral body at the apex of each curve), (4) the site of the scoliosis (thoracic, thoracolumbar, or lumbar), and (5) the location of the lower-end vertebra. RESULTS: Only 3 (4%) of 77 patients with idiopathic scoliosis had a curve length of &gt;8 vertebrae, compared with 19 (90%) of 21 patients with neuromuscular/neuropathic scoliosis (p&lt;0.001, Fisher's exact test). 14 (18%) of the patients with idiopathic scoliosis had an S-form curve, compared with none in those with neuromuscular/neuropathic or congenital/osteogenic scoliosis (p=0.035, Fisher's exact test). No patient with idiopathic scoliosis had the lower- end vertebra located at L5, compared with 8 (38%) patients with neuromuscular scoliosis (p&lt;0.001, Fisher's exact test). The criteria for neuromuscular/neuropathic scoliosis (a curve length of &gt;8 vertebrae, a C-form or inverted C-form curve, and a lower-end vertebra located at L4 or L5) had 81% specificity, 76% sensitivity, 100% positive and 93% negative predictive values. CONCLUSION: These criteria may help identify patients with neuromuscular/neuropathic scoliosis for further investigation by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography before they undergo corrective surgery.},
  author       = {Abul-Kasim, Kasim and Ohlin, Acke},
  issn         = {1022-5536},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--5},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb04cd08)},
  series       = {Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery},
  title        = {Curve length, curve form, and location of lower-end vertebra as a means of identifying the type of scoliosis.},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2010},
}