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Knee laxity after complete anterior cruciate ligament tear: a prospective study over 15 years.

Neuman, Paul LU ; Kostogiannis, Ioannis LU ; Fridén, Thomas LU ; Roos, Harald LU ; Dahlberg, Leif LU and Englund, Martin LU (2012) In Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports 22. p.156-163
Abstract
There is limited knowledge of knee laxity in the long term after a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear treated without ACL reconstruction. The aim of this study was (1) to describe the clinical course of knee laxity after a complete ACL tear over 15 years, and (2) to study the association between knee laxity and meniscal injuries and the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We studied 100 consecutive subjects [mean (SD) age 26 (8) years] presenting with acute ACL injury prospectively. The initial treatment in all subjects was knee rehabilitation without reconstructive surgery. The subjects were examined with Lachman's and pivot-shift tests at baseline, 6 weeks, 3 months, 1 year, 3 years and 15 years after the injury.... (More)
There is limited knowledge of knee laxity in the long term after a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear treated without ACL reconstruction. The aim of this study was (1) to describe the clinical course of knee laxity after a complete ACL tear over 15 years, and (2) to study the association between knee laxity and meniscal injuries and the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We studied 100 consecutive subjects [mean (SD) age 26 (8) years] presenting with acute ACL injury prospectively. The initial treatment in all subjects was knee rehabilitation without reconstructive surgery. The subjects were examined with Lachman's and pivot-shift tests at baseline, 6 weeks, 3 months, 1 year, 3 years and 15 years after the injury. Sagittal knee laxity was also evaluated with the KT-1000 arthrometer at the 15-year follow-up. During follow-up, 22 subjects were ACL reconstructed due to unacceptable knee instability. There was only a mild remaining knee laxity [median Lachman grade and pivot-shift test value of 1 on a 4-grade scale (0-3)] after 15 years in subjects treated without primary ACL reconstruction. Knees with higher anterior sagittal knee laxity 3 months after the injury had a worse long-term outcome with respect to meniscal injuries and knee OA development. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
volume
22
pages
156 - 163
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • WOS:000301288100003
  • PMID:20673249
  • Scopus:84858242239
ISSN
1600-0838
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0838.2010.01157.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eb3d1103-8156-4f91-a8c0-f95fca22d29f (old id 1665740)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20673249?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-09-03 12:17:06
date last changed
2016-11-13 04:26:36
@misc{eb3d1103-8156-4f91-a8c0-f95fca22d29f,
  abstract     = {There is limited knowledge of knee laxity in the long term after a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear treated without ACL reconstruction. The aim of this study was (1) to describe the clinical course of knee laxity after a complete ACL tear over 15 years, and (2) to study the association between knee laxity and meniscal injuries and the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We studied 100 consecutive subjects [mean (SD) age 26 (8) years] presenting with acute ACL injury prospectively. The initial treatment in all subjects was knee rehabilitation without reconstructive surgery. The subjects were examined with Lachman's and pivot-shift tests at baseline, 6 weeks, 3 months, 1 year, 3 years and 15 years after the injury. Sagittal knee laxity was also evaluated with the KT-1000 arthrometer at the 15-year follow-up. During follow-up, 22 subjects were ACL reconstructed due to unacceptable knee instability. There was only a mild remaining knee laxity [median Lachman grade and pivot-shift test value of 1 on a 4-grade scale (0-3)] after 15 years in subjects treated without primary ACL reconstruction. Knees with higher anterior sagittal knee laxity 3 months after the injury had a worse long-term outcome with respect to meniscal injuries and knee OA development.},
  author       = {Neuman, Paul and Kostogiannis, Ioannis and Fridén, Thomas and Roos, Harald and Dahlberg, Leif and Englund, Martin},
  issn         = {1600-0838},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {156--163},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8a2fcf8)},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports},
  title        = {Knee laxity after complete anterior cruciate ligament tear: a prospective study over 15 years.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2010.01157.x},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2012},
}