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Human Rights and the Dark Side of Globalisation: Transnational Law Enforcement and Migration Control

(2016) In Routledge Studies in Human Rights
Abstract
This edited volume examines the continued viability of international human rights law in the context of growing transnational law enforcement. With states increasingly making use of global governance modes, core exercises of public authority such as migration control, surveillance, detention and policing, are increasingly conducted extraterritorially, outsourced to foreign governments or delegated to non-state actors.

New forms of cooperation raise difficult questions about divided, shared and joint responsibility under international human rights law. At the same time, some governments engage in transnational law enforcement exactly to avoid such responsibilities, creatively seeking to navigate the complex, overlapping and... (More)
This edited volume examines the continued viability of international human rights law in the context of growing transnational law enforcement. With states increasingly making use of global governance modes, core exercises of public authority such as migration control, surveillance, detention and policing, are increasingly conducted extraterritorially, outsourced to foreign governments or delegated to non-state actors.

New forms of cooperation raise difficult questions about divided, shared and joint responsibility under international human rights law. At the same time, some governments engage in transnational law enforcement exactly to avoid such responsibilities, creatively seeking to navigate the complex, overlapping and sometimes unclear bodies of international law. As such, this volume argues that this area represents a particular dark side of globalisation, requiring both scholars and practitioners to revisit basic assumptions and legal strategies. (Less)
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organization
publishing date
type
Book/Report
publication status
in press
keywords
human rights, international law, extraterritorial obligations, law and politics
in
Routledge Studies in Human Rights
editor
Gammeltoft, Thomas LU and Vedsted-Hansen, Jens
pages
344 pages
publisher
Routledge
ISBN
9781138222243
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
16a20a99-d774-467b-aeb2-1c0c59706c59
date added to LUP
2016-05-18 16:40:09
date last changed
2016-11-29 11:05:36
@misc{16a20a99-d774-467b-aeb2-1c0c59706c59,
  abstract     = {This edited volume examines the continued viability of international human rights law in the context of growing transnational law enforcement. With states increasingly making use of global governance modes, core exercises of public authority such as migration control, surveillance, detention and policing, are increasingly conducted extraterritorially, outsourced to foreign governments or delegated to non-state actors.<br/><br/>New forms of cooperation raise difficult questions about divided, shared and joint responsibility under international human rights law. At the same time, some governments engage in transnational law enforcement exactly to avoid such responsibilities, creatively seeking to navigate the complex, overlapping and sometimes unclear bodies of international law. As such, this volume argues that this area represents a particular dark side of globalisation, requiring both scholars and practitioners to revisit basic assumptions and legal strategies.},
  editor       = {Gammeltoft, Thomas and Vedsted-Hansen, Jens},
  isbn         = {9781138222243},
  keyword      = {human rights,international law,extraterritorial obligations,law and politics},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {344},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xc4a6b60)},
  series       = {Routledge Studies in Human Rights},
  title        = {Human Rights and the Dark Side of Globalisation: Transnational Law Enforcement and Migration Control},
  year         = {2016},
}