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Mental health problems in youths committed to juvenile institutions: prevalences and treatment needs.

Ståhlberg, Ola; Anckarsäter, Henrik LU and Nilsson, Thomas LU (2010) In European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 19. p.893-903
Abstract
Many international studies show that adolescents in coercive institutional care display high prevalences of mental disorders, especially in the form of disruptive behavior disorders [including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder], anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. High degrees of overlap across mental disorders have also been reported. In addition, institutionalized adolescents are often traumatized. Despite this well-documented psychiatric morbidity, the mental health care needs of detained adolescents are often overlooked. The main objective of this study is to assess prevalences of psychiatric disorders, results of intelligence tests, and previous contacts with child... (More)
Many international studies show that adolescents in coercive institutional care display high prevalences of mental disorders, especially in the form of disruptive behavior disorders [including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder], anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. High degrees of overlap across mental disorders have also been reported. In addition, institutionalized adolescents are often traumatized. Despite this well-documented psychiatric morbidity, the mental health care needs of detained adolescents are often overlooked. The main objective of this study is to assess prevalences of psychiatric disorders, results of intelligence tests, and previous contacts with child and adolescent psychiatric services among adolescents in institutional care. DSM-IV diagnoses, mental health contacts, substance abuse, neurocognitive abilities, and school performance were registered in 100 adolescents (92 boys, 8 girls) aged 12-19 years (mean age 16.0; SD ± 1.5) consecutively committed to Swedish juvenile institutions between 2004 and 2007. At least one psychiatric disorder was diagnosed in 73% of the subjects: 48% met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for AD/HD, 17% for an autism spectrum disorder, and 10% for a mental retardation. The collapsed prevalence for psychiatric disorders requiring specialist attention was 63%. Our data indicate that systematic diagnostic procedures are crucial in the treatment planning for institutionalized adolescents. Adequate treatment strategies need to be designed and implemented to meet the extensive mental health care needs of this vulnerable population. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
volume
19
pages
893 - 903
publisher
Springer Medizin
external identifiers
  • WOS:000284422500005
  • PMID:20949366
  • Scopus:77957734381
ISSN
1435-165X
DOI
10.1007/s00787-010-0137-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
71ccd14a-1f03-4c9c-baa2-6d0a59560552 (old id 1711125)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20949366?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-11-05 13:11:39
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:26:12
@misc{71ccd14a-1f03-4c9c-baa2-6d0a59560552,
  abstract     = {Many international studies show that adolescents in coercive institutional care display high prevalences of mental disorders, especially in the form of disruptive behavior disorders [including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder], anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. High degrees of overlap across mental disorders have also been reported. In addition, institutionalized adolescents are often traumatized. Despite this well-documented psychiatric morbidity, the mental health care needs of detained adolescents are often overlooked. The main objective of this study is to assess prevalences of psychiatric disorders, results of intelligence tests, and previous contacts with child and adolescent psychiatric services among adolescents in institutional care. DSM-IV diagnoses, mental health contacts, substance abuse, neurocognitive abilities, and school performance were registered in 100 adolescents (92 boys, 8 girls) aged 12-19 years (mean age 16.0; SD ± 1.5) consecutively committed to Swedish juvenile institutions between 2004 and 2007. At least one psychiatric disorder was diagnosed in 73% of the subjects: 48% met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for AD/HD, 17% for an autism spectrum disorder, and 10% for a mental retardation. The collapsed prevalence for psychiatric disorders requiring specialist attention was 63%. Our data indicate that systematic diagnostic procedures are crucial in the treatment planning for institutionalized adolescents. Adequate treatment strategies need to be designed and implemented to meet the extensive mental health care needs of this vulnerable population.},
  author       = {Ståhlberg, Ola and Anckarsäter, Henrik and Nilsson, Thomas},
  issn         = {1435-165X},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {893--903},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9aa0458)},
  series       = {European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry},
  title        = {Mental health problems in youths committed to juvenile institutions: prevalences and treatment needs.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-010-0137-1},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2010},
}