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New injection recommendations for patients with diabetes.

Frid, Anders LU ; Hirsch, L; Gaspar, R; Hicks, D; Kreugel, G; Liersch, J; Letondeur, C; Sauvanet, J P; Tubiana-Rufi, N and Strauss, K (2010) In Diabetes & Metabolism 36 Suppl 1. p.3-18
Abstract
AIM: Injections administered by patients are one of the mainstays of diabetes management. Proper injection technique is vital to avoiding intramuscular injections, ensuring appropriate delivery to the subcutaneous tissues and avoiding common complications such as lipohypertrophy. Yet few formal guidelines have been published summarizing all that is known about best practice. We propose new injection guidelines which are thoroughly evidence-based, written and vetted by a large group of international injection experts. METHODS: A systematic literature study was conducted for all peer-reviewed studies and publications which bear on injections in diabetes. An international group of experts met regularly over a two-year period to review this... (More)
AIM: Injections administered by patients are one of the mainstays of diabetes management. Proper injection technique is vital to avoiding intramuscular injections, ensuring appropriate delivery to the subcutaneous tissues and avoiding common complications such as lipohypertrophy. Yet few formal guidelines have been published summarizing all that is known about best practice. We propose new injection guidelines which are thoroughly evidence-based, written and vetted by a large group of international injection experts. METHODS: A systematic literature study was conducted for all peer-reviewed studies and publications which bear on injections in diabetes. An international group of experts met regularly over a two-year period to review this literature and draft the recommendations. These were then presented for review and revision to 127 experts from 27 countries at the TITAN workshop in September, 2009. RESULTS: Of 292 articles reviewed, 157 were found to meet the criteria of relevance to the recommendations. Each recommendation was graded by the weight it should have in daily practice and by its degree of support in the medical literature. The topics covered include The Role of the Professional, Psychological Challenges, Education, Site Care, Storage, Suspension and Priming, Injecting Process, Proper Use of Pens and Syringes, Insulin analogues, Human and Pre-mixed Insulins, GLP-1 analogs, Needle Length, Skin Folds, Lipohypertrophy, Rotation, Bleeding and Bruising, Pregnancy, Safety and Disposal. CONCLUSION: These injecting recommendations provide practical guidance and fill an important gap in diabetes management. If followed, they should help ensure comfortable, effective and largely complication-free injections. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes & Metabolism
volume
36 Suppl 1
pages
3 - 18
publisher
Masson Editeur
external identifiers
  • WOS:000282633100002
  • PMID:20933208
  • Scopus:77957713706
ISSN
1878-1780
DOI
10.1016/S1262-3636(10)70002-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
07421512-3965-41cc-bd1f-ad6c4019349d (old id 1711329)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20933208?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-11-05 13:00:01
date last changed
2016-11-20 04:23:56
@misc{07421512-3965-41cc-bd1f-ad6c4019349d,
  abstract     = {AIM: Injections administered by patients are one of the mainstays of diabetes management. Proper injection technique is vital to avoiding intramuscular injections, ensuring appropriate delivery to the subcutaneous tissues and avoiding common complications such as lipohypertrophy. Yet few formal guidelines have been published summarizing all that is known about best practice. We propose new injection guidelines which are thoroughly evidence-based, written and vetted by a large group of international injection experts. METHODS: A systematic literature study was conducted for all peer-reviewed studies and publications which bear on injections in diabetes. An international group of experts met regularly over a two-year period to review this literature and draft the recommendations. These were then presented for review and revision to 127 experts from 27 countries at the TITAN workshop in September, 2009. RESULTS: Of 292 articles reviewed, 157 were found to meet the criteria of relevance to the recommendations. Each recommendation was graded by the weight it should have in daily practice and by its degree of support in the medical literature. The topics covered include The Role of the Professional, Psychological Challenges, Education, Site Care, Storage, Suspension and Priming, Injecting Process, Proper Use of Pens and Syringes, Insulin analogues, Human and Pre-mixed Insulins, GLP-1 analogs, Needle Length, Skin Folds, Lipohypertrophy, Rotation, Bleeding and Bruising, Pregnancy, Safety and Disposal. CONCLUSION: These injecting recommendations provide practical guidance and fill an important gap in diabetes management. If followed, they should help ensure comfortable, effective and largely complication-free injections.},
  author       = {Frid, Anders and Hirsch, L and Gaspar, R and Hicks, D and Kreugel, G and Liersch, J and Letondeur, C and Sauvanet, J P and Tubiana-Rufi, N and Strauss, K},
  issn         = {1878-1780},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {3--18},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb45f010)},
  series       = {Diabetes & Metabolism},
  title        = {New injection recommendations for patients with diabetes.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1262-3636(10)70002-1},
  volume       = {36 Suppl 1},
  year         = {2010},
}