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Clinical utility of tomosynthesis in suspected scaphoid fracture. A pilot study.

Geijer, Mats LU ; Börjesson, Annika M and Göthlin, Jan H (2011) In Skeletal Radiology Dec. p.863-867
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Radiography alone will not detect all scaphoid fractures. There is a reported prevalence between 9 and 33% of occult scaphoid fractures. The evidence-based literature suggests that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most suitable secondary imaging modality due to the ability to evaluate the bone marrow directly and to also identify other injuries. However, there is no consensus on the choice of follow-up imaging strategy-computed tomography, MRI, or bone scan-across different institutions. Tomosynthesis is a new digital tomographic method creating multiple thin tomographic sections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of tomosynthesis in suspected occult fracture. METHODS: Thirty-five patients... (More)
BACKGROUND: Radiography alone will not detect all scaphoid fractures. There is a reported prevalence between 9 and 33% of occult scaphoid fractures. The evidence-based literature suggests that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most suitable secondary imaging modality due to the ability to evaluate the bone marrow directly and to also identify other injuries. However, there is no consensus on the choice of follow-up imaging strategy-computed tomography, MRI, or bone scan-across different institutions. Tomosynthesis is a new digital tomographic method creating multiple thin tomographic sections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of tomosynthesis in suspected occult fracture. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with a clinically suspected occult scaphoid fracture after initial normal radiography were imaged with repeat radiography and tomosynthesis scan 2 weeks after trauma. RESULTS: Repeat radiography revealed one previously undetected scaphoid tubercle avulsion and one scaphoid waist fracture, confirmed by tomosynthesis. Tomosynthesis revealed two additional scaphoid waist fractures. In total, three initially occult scaphoid waist fractures were detected (9%). No additional fractures were detected in the remaining 32 patients during a 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: Tomosynthesis can demonstrate occult scaphoid fractures not visible at radiography. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Skeletal Radiology
volume
Dec
pages
863 - 867
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • WOS:000290685200007
  • PMID:21057785
  • Scopus:79959945883
ISSN
1432-2161
DOI
10.1007/s00256-010-1049-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
037b74a3-7e8d-4323-9333-8c67df8f04ba (old id 1732204)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21057785?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-12-01 11:21:25
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:28:39
@misc{037b74a3-7e8d-4323-9333-8c67df8f04ba,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Radiography alone will not detect all scaphoid fractures. There is a reported prevalence between 9 and 33% of occult scaphoid fractures. The evidence-based literature suggests that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most suitable secondary imaging modality due to the ability to evaluate the bone marrow directly and to also identify other injuries. However, there is no consensus on the choice of follow-up imaging strategy-computed tomography, MRI, or bone scan-across different institutions. Tomosynthesis is a new digital tomographic method creating multiple thin tomographic sections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of tomosynthesis in suspected occult fracture. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with a clinically suspected occult scaphoid fracture after initial normal radiography were imaged with repeat radiography and tomosynthesis scan 2 weeks after trauma. RESULTS: Repeat radiography revealed one previously undetected scaphoid tubercle avulsion and one scaphoid waist fracture, confirmed by tomosynthesis. Tomosynthesis revealed two additional scaphoid waist fractures. In total, three initially occult scaphoid waist fractures were detected (9%). No additional fractures were detected in the remaining 32 patients during a 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: Tomosynthesis can demonstrate occult scaphoid fractures not visible at radiography.},
  author       = {Geijer, Mats and Börjesson, Annika M and Göthlin, Jan H},
  issn         = {1432-2161},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {863--867},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9a29d80)},
  series       = {Skeletal Radiology},
  title        = {Clinical utility of tomosynthesis in suspected scaphoid fracture. A pilot study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-010-1049-3},
  volume       = {Dec},
  year         = {2011},
}