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A Small Region in a Global World. Patterns in Scandinavian Film and TV Culture

Bondebjerg, Ib; Novrup Redvall, Eva; Hedling, Olof LU ; Hedling, Erik LU ; Diurlin, Lars LU ; Solum, Ove and Hansen, Lene V. (2010)
Abstract
In this report we have analysed the Scandinavian film and television culture focusing on films released between 2002-2006, using data drawn from both cinemas in Scandinavia and in the rest of Europe, as well as films shown on television in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The study involves a comparative look at the support mechanisms and the production sector as well as the distribution sector, especially co-productions, but the main focus is on film genres and TV drama, audiences and the Scandinavian and European distribution of films.

One of the main conclusions of the report is that whereas there continues to exist a successful Scandinavian tradition of co-production and co-distribution between the Nordic public service TV... (More)
In this report we have analysed the Scandinavian film and television culture focusing on films released between 2002-2006, using data drawn from both cinemas in Scandinavia and in the rest of Europe, as well as films shown on television in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The study involves a comparative look at the support mechanisms and the production sector as well as the distribution sector, especially co-productions, but the main focus is on film genres and TV drama, audiences and the Scandinavian and European distribution of films.

One of the main conclusions of the report is that whereas there continues to exist a successful Scandinavian tradition of co-production and co-distribution between the Nordic public service TV stations, with loyal audiences watching TV dramas from their neighbouring Scandinavian countries, this is not the case when it comes to film. Even though a Scandinavian film culture does exist and consists of a rather unique transnational framework for cooperation – at least seen from a European perspective, where no such regional cooperation exists – the result with regards to the exchange of films and film audiences is disappointing. The report shows that if one adds the total cinema admissions for films from Denmark, Norway and Sweden between 2002-2006 and divide them into the three categories National (Danish, Norwegian and Swedish films on their own national market), Scandinavian (Danish, Norwegian and Swedish films on the other Scandinavian markets) and EU (the three countries’ admissions in the rest of EU36) the figures are as follows: 71%, 5% and 24% (fig. 22). The conclusion is thus that on average the non-national Scandinavian market is of least importance, the EU market is almost five times bigger, whereas the national market is the most important. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Working Paper
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Swedish film, film production, contemporary film, Scandinavian film
pages
158 pages
publisher
Scandinavian ThinkTank, European ThinkTank on Film and Film Policy
project
Europeisk, skandinavisk och regional film och filmproduktion
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d736667e-abb6-4e2d-87a5-47dbe7ff0822 (old id 1734599)
alternative location
http://cemes.ku.dk/working_papers/scandinavian_cinema/Scandinavian_cinema-Final_LRL_.pdf/
date added to LUP
2010-12-02 12:48:11
date last changed
2016-04-16 10:32:03
@misc{d736667e-abb6-4e2d-87a5-47dbe7ff0822,
  abstract     = {In this report we have analysed the Scandinavian film and television culture focusing on films released between 2002-2006, using data drawn from both cinemas in Scandinavia and in the rest of Europe, as well as films shown on television in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The study involves a comparative look at the support mechanisms and the production sector as well as the distribution sector, especially co-productions, but the main focus is on film genres and TV drama, audiences and the Scandinavian and European distribution of films.<br/><br>
	One of the main conclusions of the report is that whereas there continues to exist a successful Scandinavian tradition of co-production and co-distribution between the Nordic public service TV stations, with loyal audiences watching TV dramas from their neighbouring Scandinavian countries, this is not the case when it comes to film. Even though a Scandinavian film culture does exist and consists of a rather unique transnational framework for cooperation – at least seen from a European perspective, where no such regional cooperation exists – the result with regards to the exchange of films and film audiences is disappointing. The report shows that if one adds the total cinema admissions for films from Denmark, Norway and Sweden between 2002-2006 and divide them into the three categories National (Danish, Norwegian and Swedish films on their own national market), Scandinavian (Danish, Norwegian and Swedish films on the other Scandinavian markets) and EU (the three countries’ admissions in the rest of EU36) the figures are as follows: 71%, 5% and 24% (fig. 22). The conclusion is thus that on average the non-national Scandinavian market is of least importance, the EU market is almost five times bigger, whereas the national market is the most important.},
  author       = {Bondebjerg, Ib and Novrup Redvall, Eva and Hedling, Olof and Hedling, Erik and Diurlin, Lars and Solum, Ove and Hansen, Lene V.},
  keyword      = {Swedish film,film production,contemporary film,Scandinavian film},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {158},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xab16d20)},
  title        = {A Small Region in a Global World. Patterns in Scandinavian Film and TV Culture},
  year         = {2010},
}