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Successful Photopatch Testing with Ketoprofen Using One-Hour Occlusion.

Marmgren, Victoria LU ; Hindsén, Monica LU ; Zimerson, Erik LU and Bruze, Magnus (2011) In Acta Dermato-Venereologica 91. p.131-136
Abstract
The standard procedure for photopatch testing includes 24-h occlusion of the allergen, followed by irradiation at 5 J/cm2 ultraviolet A (UVA). Due to the timing, a separate visit to the clinic is needed for UV irradiation. The aim of this study was to determine whether a reduction in occlusion time from 24 h to 1 h, in order to simplify the testing procedure, influences test results when photopatch testing with ketoprofen. A total of 22 patients with a known or suspected photo-allergy to ketoprofen were simultaneously photopatch-tested with ketoprofen using both 1 h and 24 h occlusion. One side of the patient's back was irradiated with 5 J/cm2 UVA, and the other side was covered. Measurements were made after 3 days on both irradiated and... (More)
The standard procedure for photopatch testing includes 24-h occlusion of the allergen, followed by irradiation at 5 J/cm2 ultraviolet A (UVA). Due to the timing, a separate visit to the clinic is needed for UV irradiation. The aim of this study was to determine whether a reduction in occlusion time from 24 h to 1 h, in order to simplify the testing procedure, influences test results when photopatch testing with ketoprofen. A total of 22 patients with a known or suspected photo-allergy to ketoprofen were simultaneously photopatch-tested with ketoprofen using both 1 h and 24 h occlusion. One side of the patient's back was irradiated with 5 J/cm2 UVA, and the other side was covered. Measurements were made after 3 days on both irradiated and non-irradiated sides. A total of 20 controls were photopatch-tested with ketoprofen using 1 h occlusion. All of the patients showed positive reactions on the irradiated side. No positive reactions were observed on the non-irradiated side. All controls were negative. In conclusion, 1 h occlusion time is sufficient to establish photo-contact allergy to ketoprofen. No adjustments in UVA or ketoprofen dose were needed. Limiting occlu-sion time to 1 h could simplify the photopatch test procedure by eliminating one visit to the clinic. These results apply only to ketoprofen; further studies are needed to determine whether a similar approach can be used with other components of photopatch test series. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Dermato-Venereologica
volume
91
pages
131 - 136
publisher
Medical Journals Limited
external identifiers
  • WOS:000289042900003
  • PMID:21327321
  • Scopus:79952366717
ISSN
1651-2057
DOI
10.2340/00015555-1029
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d9f63c87-b743-4575-9824-275c1c0818cf (old id 1831735)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21327321?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-03-01 16:46:57
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:32:03
@misc{d9f63c87-b743-4575-9824-275c1c0818cf,
  abstract     = {The standard procedure for photopatch testing includes 24-h occlusion of the allergen, followed by irradiation at 5 J/cm2 ultraviolet A (UVA). Due to the timing, a separate visit to the clinic is needed for UV irradiation. The aim of this study was to determine whether a reduction in occlusion time from 24 h to 1 h, in order to simplify the testing procedure, influences test results when photopatch testing with ketoprofen. A total of 22 patients with a known or suspected photo-allergy to ketoprofen were simultaneously photopatch-tested with ketoprofen using both 1 h and 24 h occlusion. One side of the patient's back was irradiated with 5 J/cm2 UVA, and the other side was covered. Measurements were made after 3 days on both irradiated and non-irradiated sides. A total of 20 controls were photopatch-tested with ketoprofen using 1 h occlusion. All of the patients showed positive reactions on the irradiated side. No positive reactions were observed on the non-irradiated side. All controls were negative. In conclusion, 1 h occlusion time is sufficient to establish photo-contact allergy to ketoprofen. No adjustments in UVA or ketoprofen dose were needed. Limiting occlu-sion time to 1 h could simplify the photopatch test procedure by eliminating one visit to the clinic. These results apply only to ketoprofen; further studies are needed to determine whether a similar approach can be used with other components of photopatch test series.},
  author       = {Marmgren, Victoria and Hindsén, Monica and Zimerson, Erik and Bruze, Magnus},
  issn         = {1651-2057},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {131--136},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb1c8af8)},
  series       = {Acta Dermato-Venereologica},
  title        = {Successful Photopatch Testing with Ketoprofen Using One-Hour Occlusion.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-1029},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2011},
}