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A model for an inclusive healthcare information system

Eftring, Håkan LU (2011) Include 2011 In Include 2011 proceedings
Abstract
Healthcare organisations such as hospitals communicate both public and personal information to citizens. Accessible websites are suited for public information, but personal information (e.g. medical appointment notices) is still sent out by ordinary post in the form of text on a paper. Sometimes a person has to ask repeatedly for accessible information and is forced to adapt to the information system, rather than the other way around.



This paper presents a model for adapting information automatically to each individual’s preferences and a list of such preferences resulting from interviews with persons with disabilities. The model facilitates an innovative process where a healthcare organisation and citizens work together... (More)
Healthcare organisations such as hospitals communicate both public and personal information to citizens. Accessible websites are suited for public information, but personal information (e.g. medical appointment notices) is still sent out by ordinary post in the form of text on a paper. Sometimes a person has to ask repeatedly for accessible information and is forced to adapt to the information system, rather than the other way around.



This paper presents a model for adapting information automatically to each individual’s preferences and a list of such preferences resulting from interviews with persons with disabilities. The model facilitates an innovative process where a healthcare organisation and citizens work together in four steps: 1) A person’s information preferences are stored in a database in the hospital’s improved information system and can be updated at any time. 2) When the caregiver sends out information, a notification module retrieves the personal preferences from the database and adapts the information. 3) The person receives individualised information. 4) Preferences stored by citizens, but not yet implemented, can be used for further development of the inclusive information system. A prototype web form was then developed and evaluated by people from disability and elderly organisations. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Accessibility, Diversity, Healthcare information systems
in
Include 2011 proceedings
pages
10 pages
publisher
The Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design at the Royal College of Art, London, UK
conference name
Include 2011
ISBN
978-1-907342-29-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e7f6ceb4-9f03-48ca-8aba-d118f5d659ec (old id 1961705)
alternative location
http://include11.kinetixevents.co.uk/4dcgi/prog?operation=detail&paper_id=473
date added to LUP
2011-05-31 13:58:15
date last changed
2016-04-16 10:15:07
@misc{e7f6ceb4-9f03-48ca-8aba-d118f5d659ec,
  abstract     = {Healthcare organisations such as hospitals communicate both public and personal information to citizens. Accessible websites are suited for public information, but personal information (e.g. medical appointment notices) is still sent out by ordinary post in the form of text on a paper. Sometimes a person has to ask repeatedly for accessible information and is forced to adapt to the information system, rather than the other way around.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
This paper presents a model for adapting information automatically to each individual’s preferences and a list of such preferences resulting from interviews with persons with disabilities. The model facilitates an innovative process where a healthcare organisation and citizens work together in four steps: 1) A person’s information preferences are stored in a database in the hospital’s improved information system and can be updated at any time. 2) When the caregiver sends out information, a notification module retrieves the personal preferences from the database and adapts the information. 3) The person receives individualised information. 4) Preferences stored by citizens, but not yet implemented, can be used for further development of the inclusive information system. A prototype web form was then developed and evaluated by people from disability and elderly organisations.},
  author       = {Eftring, Håkan},
  isbn         = {978-1-907342-29-5},
  keyword      = {Accessibility,Diversity,Healthcare information systems},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {10},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8e5cba8)},
  series       = {Include 2011 proceedings},
  title        = {A model for an inclusive healthcare information system},
  year         = {2011},
}