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Climat change and occupational heat stress: methods for assessment

Holmér, Ingvar LU (2010) In Global Health Action p.1-5
Abstract
Background: Presumed effects of global warming on occupational heat stress aggravate conditions in many

parts of the world, in particular in developing countries. In order to assess and evaluate conditions, heat stress

must be described correctly and measured correctly.

Objective: Assessment of heat stress using internationally recognized methods.

Design: Two such methods are wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT; ISO 7243) and predicted heat strain

(PHS; ISO 7933). Both methods measure relevant climatic factors and provide recommendations for limit

values in terms of time when heat stress becomes imminent. The WBGTas a heat stress index is empirical and

widely recognized. It... (More)
Background: Presumed effects of global warming on occupational heat stress aggravate conditions in many

parts of the world, in particular in developing countries. In order to assess and evaluate conditions, heat stress

must be described correctly and measured correctly.

Objective: Assessment of heat stress using internationally recognized methods.

Design: Two such methods are wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT; ISO 7243) and predicted heat strain

(PHS; ISO 7933). Both methods measure relevant climatic factors and provide recommendations for limit

values in terms of time when heat stress becomes imminent. The WBGTas a heat stress index is empirical and

widely recognized. It requires, however, special sensors for the climatic factors that can introduce significant

measurement errors if prescriptions in ISO 7243 are not followed. The PHS (ISO 7933) is based on climatic

factors that can easily be measured with traditional instruments. It evaluates the conditions for heat balance

in a more rational way and it applies equally to all combinations of climates.

Results: Analyzing similar climatic conditions with WBGT and PHS indicate that WBGT provides a more

conservative assessment philosophy that allows much shorter working time than predicted with PHS.

Conclusions: Both methods should be used and validated worldwide in order to give reliable and accurate

information about the actual heat stress. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
global warming, heat stress indices, physiological strain, productivity
in
Global Health Action
pages
1 - 5
publisher
Co-action Publishing
ISSN
1654-9880
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a70f84b6-ea47-48ac-a208-4c98ec410a7b (old id 1969450)
date added to LUP
2011-05-25 16:57:52
date last changed
2016-04-16 11:47:04
@misc{a70f84b6-ea47-48ac-a208-4c98ec410a7b,
  abstract     = {Background: Presumed effects of global warming on occupational heat stress aggravate conditions in many<br/><br>
parts of the world, in particular in developing countries. In order to assess and evaluate conditions, heat stress<br/><br>
must be described correctly and measured correctly.<br/><br>
Objective: Assessment of heat stress using internationally recognized methods.<br/><br>
Design: Two such methods are wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT; ISO 7243) and predicted heat strain<br/><br>
(PHS; ISO 7933). Both methods measure relevant climatic factors and provide recommendations for limit<br/><br>
values in terms of time when heat stress becomes imminent. The WBGTas a heat stress index is empirical and<br/><br>
widely recognized. It requires, however, special sensors for the climatic factors that can introduce significant<br/><br>
measurement errors if prescriptions in ISO 7243 are not followed. The PHS (ISO 7933) is based on climatic<br/><br>
factors that can easily be measured with traditional instruments. It evaluates the conditions for heat balance<br/><br>
in a more rational way and it applies equally to all combinations of climates.<br/><br>
Results: Analyzing similar climatic conditions with WBGT and PHS indicate that WBGT provides a more<br/><br>
conservative assessment philosophy that allows much shorter working time than predicted with PHS.<br/><br>
Conclusions: Both methods should be used and validated worldwide in order to give reliable and accurate<br/><br>
information about the actual heat stress.},
  author       = {Holmér, Ingvar},
  issn         = {1654-9880},
  keyword      = {global warming,heat stress indices,physiological strain,productivity},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--5},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa1807b0)},
  series       = {Global Health Action},
  title        = {Climat change and occupational heat stress: methods for assessment},
  year         = {2010},
}