Advanced

Outsourcing trust to the information infrastructure in schools : how search engines order knowledge in education practices

Sundin, Olof LU and Carlsson, Hanna LU (2016) In Journal of Documentation 72(6). p.990-1007
Abstract
Purpose – This paper investigates the experiences of school teachers of supporting pupils and their apprehensions of how pupils search and assess information when search engines have become a technology of literacy in schools. By situating technologies of literacy as sociomaterial the purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss these experiences and understandings in order to challenge dominant views of search in information literacy research.
Design/methodology/approach – Six focus group interviews with in total 39 teachers working at four different elementary and secondary schools were conducted in the autumn of 2014. Analysis was done using a sociomaterial perspective, which provides tools for understanding how pupils and... (More)
Purpose – This paper investigates the experiences of school teachers of supporting pupils and their apprehensions of how pupils search and assess information when search engines have become a technology of literacy in schools. By situating technologies of literacy as sociomaterial the purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss these experiences and understandings in order to challenge dominant views of search in information literacy research.
Design/methodology/approach – Six focus group interviews with in total 39 teachers working at four different elementary and secondary schools were conducted in the autumn of 2014. Analysis was done using a sociomaterial perspective, which provides tools for understanding how pupils and teachers interact with and are demanded to translate their interest to technologies of literacy, in this case search engines, such as Google.
Findings – The teachers expressed difficulties of conceptualizing search as something they could teach. When they did, search was most often identified as a practical skill. A critical perspective on search, recognizing the role of Google as a dominant part of the information infrastructure and a co- constructor of what there is to know was largely lacking. As a consequence of this neglected responsibility of teaching search, critical assessment of online information was conflated with Google’s relevance ranking.
Originality/value – The study develops a critical understanding of the role of searching and search engines as technologies of literacy in relation to critical assessment in schools. This is of value for information literacy training.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Information literacy, Trust, Schools, Search engines, Sociomaterial, Searching, Information infrastructure
in
Journal of Documentation
volume
72
issue
6
pages
18 pages
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84987899774
ISSN
0022-0418
DOI
10.1108/JD-12-2015-0148
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1ea42f48-cba6-405b-8f45-b82cab319210
date added to LUP
2016-05-17 14:28:18
date last changed
2016-11-20 04:33:34
@misc{1ea42f48-cba6-405b-8f45-b82cab319210,
  abstract     = {Purpose – This paper investigates the experiences of school teachers of supporting pupils and their apprehensions of how pupils search and assess information when search engines have become a technology of literacy in schools. By situating technologies of literacy as sociomaterial the purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss these experiences and understandings in order to challenge dominant views of search in information literacy research.<br/>Design/methodology/approach – Six focus group interviews with in total 39 teachers working at four different elementary and secondary schools were conducted in the autumn of 2014. Analysis was done using a sociomaterial perspective, which provides tools for understanding how pupils and teachers interact with and are demanded to translate their interest to technologies of literacy, in this case search engines, such as Google.<br/>Findings – The teachers expressed difficulties of conceptualizing search as something they could teach. When they did, search was most often identified as a practical skill. A critical perspective on search, recognizing the role of Google as a dominant part of the information infrastructure and a co- constructor of what there is to know was largely lacking. As a consequence of this neglected responsibility of teaching search, critical assessment of online information was conflated with Google’s relevance ranking.<br/>Originality/value – The study develops a critical understanding of the role of searching and search engines as technologies of literacy in relation to critical assessment in schools. This is of value for information literacy training.<br/><br/>},
  author       = {Sundin, Olof and Carlsson, Hanna},
  issn         = {0022-0418},
  keyword      = {Information literacy,Trust,Schools,Search engines,Sociomaterial,Searching,Information infrastructure},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {990--1007},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9698e10)},
  series       = {Journal of Documentation},
  title        = {Outsourcing trust to the information infrastructure in schools : how search engines order knowledge in education practices},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JD-12-2015-0148},
  volume       = {72},
  year         = {2016},
}