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Socioeconomic status, labour market connection, and self-rated psychological health: The role of social capital and economic stress.

Lindström, Martin LU ; Ali, Sadiq Mohammad and Rosvall, Maria LU (2012) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 40. p.51-60
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate the association between socioeconomic status, unemployment and self-rated psychological health, taking economic stress and horizontal trust into account. Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2008 public health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study with a 55% participation rate. A random sample was invited and 28,198 persons aged 18-80 participated. Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between socioeconomic status by occupation (SES), labour market connection and self-rated psychological health (GHQ12). The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth, education, economic stress and generalized (horizontal) trust. RESULTS: 13.8% of the men and... (More)
AIMS: To investigate the association between socioeconomic status, unemployment and self-rated psychological health, taking economic stress and horizontal trust into account. Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2008 public health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study with a 55% participation rate. A random sample was invited and 28,198 persons aged 18-80 participated. Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between socioeconomic status by occupation (SES), labour market connection and self-rated psychological health (GHQ12). The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth, education, economic stress and generalized (horizontal) trust. RESULTS: 13.8% of the men and 18.2% of the women had poor psychological health. Poor psychological health was more common among the young, among those born abroad, among those with lower education, with economic stress, and low horizontal trust. There were no significant differences between the employed and self-employed groups. However, the people who had retired early, the unemployed and those on long-term sick leave had significantly higher odds ratios of poor psychological health than higher non-manual employees throughout the analyses. CONCLUSIONS: There were no differences in psychological health between non-manual employees in higher positions and other employed and self-employed SES groups among men or women. In contrast, the early retired, the unemployed and the category on long-term sick leave had significantly higher odds ratios of poor psychological health among both men and women throughout the multiple analyses. Both economic stress and trust affected this association (i.e., lowered the odds ratios of poor psychological health), but affected by economic stress to a somewhat higher extent. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
40
pages
51 - 60
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • WOS:000299735800007
  • PMID:21983194
  • Scopus:84856711614
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1177/1403494811421825
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3ed6acbb-277b-468b-befe-b054bd6c755d (old id 2200716)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21983194?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-11-02 08:57:20
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:35:30
@misc{3ed6acbb-277b-468b-befe-b054bd6c755d,
  abstract     = {AIMS: To investigate the association between socioeconomic status, unemployment and self-rated psychological health, taking economic stress and horizontal trust into account. Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2008 public health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study with a 55% participation rate. A random sample was invited and 28,198 persons aged 18-80 participated. Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between socioeconomic status by occupation (SES), labour market connection and self-rated psychological health (GHQ12). The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth, education, economic stress and generalized (horizontal) trust. RESULTS: 13.8% of the men and 18.2% of the women had poor psychological health. Poor psychological health was more common among the young, among those born abroad, among those with lower education, with economic stress, and low horizontal trust. There were no significant differences between the employed and self-employed groups. However, the people who had retired early, the unemployed and those on long-term sick leave had significantly higher odds ratios of poor psychological health than higher non-manual employees throughout the analyses. CONCLUSIONS: There were no differences in psychological health between non-manual employees in higher positions and other employed and self-employed SES groups among men or women. In contrast, the early retired, the unemployed and the category on long-term sick leave had significantly higher odds ratios of poor psychological health among both men and women throughout the multiple analyses. Both economic stress and trust affected this association (i.e., lowered the odds ratios of poor psychological health), but affected by economic stress to a somewhat higher extent.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin and Ali, Sadiq Mohammad and Rosvall, Maria},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {51--60},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x87c3df8)},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Socioeconomic status, labour market connection, and self-rated psychological health: The role of social capital and economic stress.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494811421825},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2012},
}