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Body Appearance and Quality of Life in Adult Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Treated with a Brace or Under Observation Alone During Adolescence.

Danielsson, Aina J; Hasserius, Ralph LU ; Ohlin, Acke LU and Nachemson, Alf L (2011) In Spine
Abstract
ABSTRACT: Study Design. The SRS brace study (JBJS-A, 1995) was comprised of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with moderate curve sizes (25-35°). Forty observed and 37 braced patients (77% of the original group) attended a follow-up a mean of 16 years after onset of maturity.Objectives. To analyze whether the subjectively evaluated present body appearance affects outcome as measured by quality of life in adult patients, previously treated by observation alone (non-braced) or with a brace during adolescence.Summary of Background Data. Few reports exist where validated outcome measures for body appearance have been used.Methods. Two quality of life questionnaires (SRS-22 and SF-36) were answered. The patient's opinion on body... (More)
ABSTRACT: Study Design. The SRS brace study (JBJS-A, 1995) was comprised of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with moderate curve sizes (25-35°). Forty observed and 37 braced patients (77% of the original group) attended a follow-up a mean of 16 years after onset of maturity.Objectives. To analyze whether the subjectively evaluated present body appearance affects outcome as measured by quality of life in adult patients, previously treated by observation alone (non-braced) or with a brace during adolescence.Summary of Background Data. Few reports exist where validated outcome measures for body appearance have been used.Methods. Two quality of life questionnaires (SRS-22 and SF-36) were answered. The patient's opinion on body appearance was evaluated pictorially (i.e. sketches) using the Spinal Appearance Questionnaire, in which seven aspects of asymmetry are graded. These scores were compared with curve sizes, scoliometer measurements for grading trunk asymmetry and quality of life measures.Results. At follow-up, both groups were similar in terms of age (mean 32 years) and curve size (mean 35°). Distortion was inversely related to SRS-22 total score and satisfaction/dissatisfaction with management subscore, but not related to the SRS-22 function subscore. No difference was found between the groups in terms of trunk rotation, where the means were 10.7° and 10.8° for the non-braced and braced patients, respectively. The non-braced patients estimated that their body appearance was significantly less distorted than the braced patients (mean 12.9 and 15.0, respectively; p = 0.0028).Conclusions. Patients who experienced less body asymmetry were more satisfied with treatment and had a better quality of life. In spite of similar curve sizes and trunk rotation in both groups, the non-braced patients felt that their body appearance was less distorted than the braced patients. (Less)
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author
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Spine
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • WOS:000303067600013
  • PMID:22037522
  • Scopus:84860320980
ISSN
0362-2436
DOI
10.1097/BRS.0b013e318231493c
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
30dcf42b-9da9-4e72-87a4-8c9cb9643c1e (old id 2221406)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22037522?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-12-01 15:09:35
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:23:43
@misc{30dcf42b-9da9-4e72-87a4-8c9cb9643c1e,
  abstract     = {ABSTRACT: Study Design. The SRS brace study (JBJS-A, 1995) was comprised of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with moderate curve sizes (25-35°). Forty observed and 37 braced patients (77% of the original group) attended a follow-up a mean of 16 years after onset of maturity.Objectives. To analyze whether the subjectively evaluated present body appearance affects outcome as measured by quality of life in adult patients, previously treated by observation alone (non-braced) or with a brace during adolescence.Summary of Background Data. Few reports exist where validated outcome measures for body appearance have been used.Methods. Two quality of life questionnaires (SRS-22 and SF-36) were answered. The patient's opinion on body appearance was evaluated pictorially (i.e. sketches) using the Spinal Appearance Questionnaire, in which seven aspects of asymmetry are graded. These scores were compared with curve sizes, scoliometer measurements for grading trunk asymmetry and quality of life measures.Results. At follow-up, both groups were similar in terms of age (mean 32 years) and curve size (mean 35°). Distortion was inversely related to SRS-22 total score and satisfaction/dissatisfaction with management subscore, but not related to the SRS-22 function subscore. No difference was found between the groups in terms of trunk rotation, where the means were 10.7° and 10.8° for the non-braced and braced patients, respectively. The non-braced patients estimated that their body appearance was significantly less distorted than the braced patients (mean 12.9 and 15.0, respectively; p = 0.0028).Conclusions. Patients who experienced less body asymmetry were more satisfied with treatment and had a better quality of life. In spite of similar curve sizes and trunk rotation in both groups, the non-braced patients felt that their body appearance was less distorted than the braced patients.},
  author       = {Danielsson, Aina J and Hasserius, Ralph and Ohlin, Acke and Nachemson, Alf L},
  issn         = {0362-2436},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x954dc20)},
  series       = {Spine},
  title        = {Body Appearance and Quality of Life in Adult Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Treated with a Brace or Under Observation Alone During Adolescence.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0b013e318231493c},
  year         = {2011},
}