Advanced

Blood pressure and other metabolic syndrome factors and risk of brain tumour in the large population-based Me-Can cohort study.

Edlinger, Michael; Strohmaier, Susanne; Jonsson, Håkan; Bjørge, Tone; Manjer, Jonas LU ; Borena, Wegene T; Häggström, Christel; Engeland, Anders; Tretli, Steinar and Concin, Hans, et al. (2012) In Journal of Hypertension 30(2). p.290-296
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:: Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults. METHODS:: In the Me-Can project, 580 000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error. RESULTS::... (More)
OBJECTIVES:: Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults. METHODS:: In the Me-Can project, 580 000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error. RESULTS:: During follow-up, 1312 primary brain tumours were diagnosed, predominantly meningioma (n = 348) and high-grade glioma (n = 436). For meningioma, the hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of SBP [hazard ratio = 1.27 per unit standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.57], of DBP (hazard ratio = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.58), and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (hazard ratio = 1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.54). An increased risk of high-grade glioma was found for DBP (hazard ratio = 1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.50) and triglycerides (hazard ratio = 1.35, 95% CI 1.05-1.72). For both meningioma and high-grade glioma, the risk was more than double in the fifth quintiles of DBP compared to the lowest quintile. For meningioma this risk was even larger for SBP. CONCLUSION:: Increased blood pressure was associated with risk of brain tumours, especially of meningiomas. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
, et al. (More)
(Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Hypertension
volume
30
issue
2
pages
290 - 296
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • WOS:000299168200009
  • PMID:22179083
  • Scopus:84855831951
ISSN
1473-5598
DOI
10.1097/HJH.0b013e32834e9176
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
972e2516-8a1c-4bfa-9c4f-6fc47d35f6e7 (old id 2273924)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22179083?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-01-03 20:21:16
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:25:03
@misc{972e2516-8a1c-4bfa-9c4f-6fc47d35f6e7,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES:: Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults. METHODS:: In the Me-Can project, 580 000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error. RESULTS:: During follow-up, 1312 primary brain tumours were diagnosed, predominantly meningioma (n = 348) and high-grade glioma (n = 436). For meningioma, the hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of SBP [hazard ratio = 1.27 per unit standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.57], of DBP (hazard ratio = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.58), and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (hazard ratio = 1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.54). An increased risk of high-grade glioma was found for DBP (hazard ratio = 1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.50) and triglycerides (hazard ratio = 1.35, 95% CI 1.05-1.72). For both meningioma and high-grade glioma, the risk was more than double in the fifth quintiles of DBP compared to the lowest quintile. For meningioma this risk was even larger for SBP. CONCLUSION:: Increased blood pressure was associated with risk of brain tumours, especially of meningiomas.},
  author       = {Edlinger, Michael and Strohmaier, Susanne and Jonsson, Håkan and Bjørge, Tone and Manjer, Jonas and Borena, Wegene T and Häggström, Christel and Engeland, Anders and Tretli, Steinar and Concin, Hans and Nagel, Gabriele and Selmer, Randi and Johansen, Dorthe and Stocks, Tanja and Hallmans, Göran and Stattin, Pär and Ulmer, Hanno},
  issn         = {1473-5598},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {290--296},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9996278)},
  series       = {Journal of Hypertension},
  title        = {Blood pressure and other metabolic syndrome factors and risk of brain tumour in the large population-based Me-Can cohort study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0b013e32834e9176},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2012},
}