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Altered bone composition in children with vertebral fractures

Tamminen, Inari; Mäyränpää, Mervi; Turunen, Mikael; Isaksson, Hanna LU ; Mäkitie, Outi; Jurvelin, Jukka and Kröger, Heikki (2011) In Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 26(9). p.2226-2234
Abstract
Primary osteoporosis in children often leads to vertebral fractures, but it remains unknown whether these fractures associate with changes in bone composition. This study aimed to determine the differences in bone composition in fracture‐prone children with and without vertebral fractures, as assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI) and bone histomorphometry. Iliac crest bone biopsies (n = 24) were obtained from children who were suspected of primary osteoporosis based on evidence from the fracture history and/or low bone mineral density (BMD) by dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry. Vertebral morphology was determined by radiography. Bone biopsies were analyzed using histomorphometry and FTIRI. Phosphate‐to‐amide... (More)
Primary osteoporosis in children often leads to vertebral fractures, but it remains unknown whether these fractures associate with changes in bone composition. This study aimed to determine the differences in bone composition in fracture‐prone children with and without vertebral fractures, as assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI) and bone histomorphometry. Iliac crest bone biopsies (n = 24) were obtained from children who were suspected of primary osteoporosis based on evidence from the fracture history and/or low bone mineral density (BMD) by dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry. Vertebral morphology was determined by radiography. Bone biopsies were analyzed using histomorphometry and FTIRI. Phosphate‐to‐amide I, carbonate‐to‐phosphate, carbonate‐to‐amide I, and cross‐link ratio (collagen maturity) were calculated. Children with (n = 14) and without (n = 10) vertebral fracture were compared. Low cancellous bone volume (BV/TV) was detected by histomorphometry in 36% of the children with vertebral fracture, and bone turnover rate was abnormal in 64% of them. Children with vertebral fractures had lower carbonate‐to‐phosphate ratios (p < .05) and higher collagen maturity (p < .05) than children without vertebral fracture. The children with low BV/TV in biopsy showed lower carbonate‐to‐amide I ratios (p < .05) than the children with normal bone volume. This study showed changes in bone composition among fracture‐prone children who had sustained a vertebral fracture. The observed changes in bone composition in these children may contribute to their greater propensity to sustain vertebral fractures. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
volume
26
issue
9
pages
2226 - 2234
publisher
AMBMR
external identifiers
  • Scopus:80051968528
ISSN
1523-4681
DOI
10.1002/jbmr.409
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
86af8ece-0198-4d95-87fa-de1d890dfdd0 (old id 2277266)
date added to LUP
2012-01-16 18:15:58
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:41:51
@misc{86af8ece-0198-4d95-87fa-de1d890dfdd0,
  abstract     = {Primary osteoporosis in children often leads to vertebral fractures, but it remains unknown whether these fractures associate with changes in bone composition. This study aimed to determine the differences in bone composition in fracture‐prone children with and without vertebral fractures, as assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI) and bone histomorphometry. Iliac crest bone biopsies (n = 24) were obtained from children who were suspected of primary osteoporosis based on evidence from the fracture history and/or low bone mineral density (BMD) by dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry. Vertebral morphology was determined by radiography. Bone biopsies were analyzed using histomorphometry and FTIRI. Phosphate‐to‐amide I, carbonate‐to‐phosphate, carbonate‐to‐amide I, and cross‐link ratio (collagen maturity) were calculated. Children with (n = 14) and without (n = 10) vertebral fracture were compared. Low cancellous bone volume (BV/TV) was detected by histomorphometry in 36% of the children with vertebral fracture, and bone turnover rate was abnormal in 64% of them. Children with vertebral fractures had lower carbonate‐to‐phosphate ratios (p &lt; .05) and higher collagen maturity (p &lt; .05) than children without vertebral fracture. The children with low BV/TV in biopsy showed lower carbonate‐to‐amide I ratios (p &lt; .05) than the children with normal bone volume. This study showed changes in bone composition among fracture‐prone children who had sustained a vertebral fracture. The observed changes in bone composition in these children may contribute to their greater propensity to sustain vertebral fractures. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research},
  author       = {Tamminen, Inari and Mäyränpää, Mervi and Turunen, Mikael and Isaksson, Hanna and Mäkitie, Outi and Jurvelin, Jukka and Kröger, Heikki},
  issn         = {1523-4681},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2226--2234},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x923a6a0)},
  series       = {Journal of Bone and Mineral Research},
  title        = {Altered bone composition in children with vertebral fractures},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.409},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2011},
}