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Positive Effects of Noise on Cognitve Performance: Explaining the Moderate Brain Arousal Model

Göran, Söderlund and Sikström, Sverker LU (2008) ICBEN 2008 In [Host publication title missing] p.378-386
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

Distractors and environmental noise has long been regarded as detrimental for cognitive processing. In particular children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are extremely sensitive to distraction from task irrelevant stimuli. However, recently it has been shown that exposure to auditory white noise facilitated cognitive performance in ADHD children whereas control children performed worse. The moderate brain arousal (MBA) model (Sikström & Söderlund, 2007) suggest that this selective effect of noise adheres from stochastic resonance (SR). This phenomenon occurs in any system where a signal plus noise requires passing of a threshold, for example the all or none nature of action... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

Distractors and environmental noise has long been regarded as detrimental for cognitive processing. In particular children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are extremely sensitive to distraction from task irrelevant stimuli. However, recently it has been shown that exposure to auditory white noise facilitated cognitive performance in ADHD children whereas control children performed worse. The moderate brain arousal (MBA) model (Sikström & Söderlund, 2007) suggest that this selective effect of noise adheres from stochastic resonance (SR). This phenomenon occurs in any system where a signal plus noise requires passing of a threshold, for example the all or none nature of action potentials in neural systems. The basic assumption is that noise in the environment, through the perceptual system introduces noise in the neural system. According to the SR phenomenon moderate noise is beneficial for cognitive performance whereas both excessive and insufficient noise is detrimental. The MBA model suggests that the amount of noise required for optimal cognitive performance is modulated by levels of dopamine. The model predictes that low dopamine children, as in ADHD, require more noise compared to high dopamine children for optimal cognitive performance; in short, when dopamine is low noise is good. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
ADHD, noise, episodic memory, dopamine, model
in
[Host publication title missing]
editor
Griefahn, Barbara
pages
9 pages
publisher
ICBEN
conference name
ICBEN 2008
ISBN
978-3-9808342-5-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
19e800e0-852d-43c1-9b03-c1e348940c8f (old id 2375170)
alternative location
http://www.icben.org/2008/index.htm
date added to LUP
2012-03-28 11:26:01
date last changed
2016-04-16 10:06:33
@misc{19e800e0-852d-43c1-9b03-c1e348940c8f,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
Distractors and environmental noise has long been regarded as detrimental for cognitive processing. In particular children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are extremely sensitive to distraction from task irrelevant stimuli. However, recently it has been shown that exposure to auditory white noise facilitated cognitive performance in ADHD children whereas control children performed worse. The moderate brain arousal (MBA) model (Sikström &amp; Söderlund, 2007) suggest that this selective effect of noise adheres from stochastic resonance (SR). This phenomenon occurs in any system where a signal plus noise requires passing of a threshold, for example the all or none nature of action potentials in neural systems. The basic assumption is that noise in the environment, through the perceptual system introduces noise in the neural system. According to the SR phenomenon moderate noise is beneficial for cognitive performance whereas both excessive and insufficient noise is detrimental. The MBA model suggests that the amount of noise required for optimal cognitive performance is modulated by levels of dopamine. The model predictes that low dopamine children, as in ADHD, require more noise compared to high dopamine children for optimal cognitive performance; in short, when dopamine is low noise is good.},
  author       = {Göran, Söderlund and Sikström, Sverker},
  editor       = {Griefahn, Barbara},
  isbn         = {978-3-9808342-5-4},
  keyword      = {ADHD,noise,episodic memory,dopamine,model},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {378--386},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x90cebb8)},
  series       = {[Host publication title missing]},
  title        = {Positive Effects of Noise on Cognitve Performance: Explaining the Moderate Brain Arousal Model},
  year         = {2008},
}