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Rendering Culture: Elsewhereness, The Ethnographic, The Surreal

Willim, Robert LU (2012) Public Ethnography
Abstract
Where are the ends of ethnography? How detached can a site-specific work be? The point of departure for discussing these questions is Elsewhereness, a series of site specific experimental films, by Anders Weberg and Robert Willim. These take the possibilities for digital media in relation to site specific art to its extremes, juxtaposing the nomadic with the placebound. The works in the series are made solely from audio and video material found on the web, material that emanates from a specific place. The audiovisual pieces are manipulated and composed into a surreal journey through an estranged landscape, based entirely on the culturally bound and stereotypical preconceptions of the artists about the actual location.



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Where are the ends of ethnography? How detached can a site-specific work be? The point of departure for discussing these questions is Elsewhereness, a series of site specific experimental films, by Anders Weberg and Robert Willim. These take the possibilities for digital media in relation to site specific art to its extremes, juxtaposing the nomadic with the placebound. The works in the series are made solely from audio and video material found on the web, material that emanates from a specific place. The audiovisual pieces are manipulated and composed into a surreal journey through an estranged landscape, based entirely on the culturally bound and stereotypical preconceptions of the artists about the actual location.



Elsewhereness is a comment on ethnographic practices, especially the assumptions that ethnography should be associated with empirical intimacy and the possibility of coming close to people in various contexts. Within several ethnographies and socially oriented site-specific art we’ll often find certain ideals embraced: participation, proximity and ideas about being “loyal to the field”, bearing witness, giving voice to people etc. Elsewhereness is instead a site-specific work where distance and even alienation is evoked. Not in order to achieve some kind of nihilistic stance, but to examine the elongations of the site-specific and the ends of ethnography. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
epistemology, site specific art, ethnography, art, art and science, artistic research, ethnographic surrealism
conference name
Public Ethnography
project
Humanistisk kulturverkstad
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
33726fb9-82bb-4c62-bec0-4c20a140c282 (old id 2856201)
date added to LUP
2012-08-10 11:05:35
date last changed
2016-04-16 10:57:55
@misc{33726fb9-82bb-4c62-bec0-4c20a140c282,
  abstract     = {Where are the ends of ethnography? How detached can a site-specific work be? The point of departure for discussing these questions is Elsewhereness, a series of site specific experimental films, by Anders Weberg and Robert Willim. These take the possibilities for digital media in relation to site specific art to its extremes, juxtaposing the nomadic with the placebound. The works in the series are made solely from audio and video material found on the web, material that emanates from a specific place. The audiovisual pieces are manipulated and composed into a surreal journey through an estranged landscape, based entirely on the culturally bound and stereotypical preconceptions of the artists about the actual location.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Elsewhereness is a comment on ethnographic practices, especially the assumptions that ethnography should be associated with empirical intimacy and the possibility of coming close to people in various contexts. Within several ethnographies and socially oriented site-specific art we’ll often find certain ideals embraced: participation, proximity and ideas about being “loyal to the field”, bearing witness, giving voice to people etc. Elsewhereness is instead a site-specific work where distance and even alienation is evoked. Not in order to achieve some kind of nihilistic stance, but to examine the elongations of the site-specific and the ends of ethnography.},
  author       = {Willim, Robert},
  keyword      = {epistemology,site specific art,ethnography,art,art and science,artistic research,ethnographic surrealism},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Rendering Culture: Elsewhereness, The Ethnographic, The Surreal},
  year         = {2012},
}