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The Scandinavian Mission of the Sisters of Saint Joseph: A female Counter-Culture in Nordic Society

Werner, Yvonne Maria LU (2014) In Religious Institutes and Catholic Culture in 19th- and 20th-century Europe
Abstract
It is well known that Catholic nuns and sisters played an important role in modern society, and that they in many ways paved the way for the entrance of women into professional life within the social sector. Modern research has also pointed out their social achievements as missionaries in the third word. But it is less known that female Catholic congregations also led school, hospitals and other social institutions in Protestant countries in northern Europe. These religious institutes accompanied the reestablishment of the Catholic Church in Scandinavia in the mid-nineteenth century, In my article, I will discuss the Scandinavian missionary activities of one of these institutes, a French congregation named La Congregation des Sœurs de... (More)
It is well known that Catholic nuns and sisters played an important role in modern society, and that they in many ways paved the way for the entrance of women into professional life within the social sector. Modern research has also pointed out their social achievements as missionaries in the third word. But it is less known that female Catholic congregations also led school, hospitals and other social institutions in Protestant countries in northern Europe. These religious institutes accompanied the reestablishment of the Catholic Church in Scandinavia in the mid-nineteenth century, In my article, I will discuss the Scandinavian missionary activities of one of these institutes, a French congregation named La Congregation des Sœurs de Saint-Joseph from Chambéry in Savoy. The Sisters of St Joseph started their missionary work with a small community in the Danish capital Copenhagen in 1856. Sixty years later there were around eight hundred St Joseph Sisters living in communities spread across the Nordic area. The Chambéry congregation, which developed a broad range of activities within health care and education, was the most successful of the female religious institutes at work in Scandinavia.



From a Nordic point of view, these Catholic sisters represented an alien culture that in essential matters conflicted with prevailing norms. They were part of a female world that in many ways constituted an alternative both to Lutheran domestic ideology with its emphasis on marriage, biological motherhood, and domestic duties, and to the middle-class liberal and socialist feminist movements. The Catholic sisters, in other words, embodied a female counter-culture in modern society, a third way between Protestant 'familyism' and feminist women’s movements. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
La Congregation des Sœurs de Saint-Joseph, female religious, Catholic mission, schools, health care, counter-culture, female leadership, celibate religious life
in
Religious Institutes and Catholic Culture in 19th- and 20th-century Europe
editor
Altermatt, Urs; De Maeyer, Jan and Metzger, Franziska
publisher
Leuven University Press
ISBN
978-94-6270-000-0
project
Det kvinnliga klosterväsendet i Norden
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fa4b60a2-76f1-479c-b8f4-a155a31f44dd (old id 3172608)
date added to LUP
2012-11-20 08:52:22
date last changed
2016-04-16 08:07:31
@misc{fa4b60a2-76f1-479c-b8f4-a155a31f44dd,
  abstract     = {It is well known that Catholic nuns and sisters played an important role in modern society, and that they in many ways paved the way for the entrance of women into professional life within the social sector. Modern research has also pointed out their social achievements as missionaries in the third word. But it is less known that female Catholic congregations also led school, hospitals and other social institutions in Protestant countries in northern Europe. These religious institutes accompanied the reestablishment of the Catholic Church in Scandinavia in the mid-nineteenth century, In my article, I will discuss the Scandinavian missionary activities of one of these institutes, a French congregation named La Congregation des Sœurs de Saint-Joseph from Chambéry in Savoy. The Sisters of St Joseph started their missionary work with a small community in the Danish capital Copenhagen in 1856. Sixty years later there were around eight hundred St Joseph Sisters living in communities spread across the Nordic area. The Chambéry congregation, which developed a broad range of activities within health care and education, was the most successful of the female religious institutes at work in Scandinavia. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
From a Nordic point of view, these Catholic sisters represented an alien culture that in essential matters conflicted with prevailing norms. They were part of a female world that in many ways constituted an alternative both to Lutheran domestic ideology with its emphasis on marriage, biological motherhood, and domestic duties, and to the middle-class liberal and socialist feminist movements. The Catholic sisters, in other words, embodied a female counter-culture in modern society, a third way between Protestant 'familyism' and feminist women’s movements.},
  author       = {Werner, Yvonne Maria},
  editor       = {Altermatt, Urs and De Maeyer, Jan and Metzger, Franziska},
  isbn         = {978-94-6270-000-0},
  keyword      = {La Congregation des Sœurs de Saint-Joseph,female religious,Catholic mission,schools,health care,counter-culture,female leadership,celibate religious life},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x80e6d98)},
  series       = {Religious Institutes and Catholic Culture in 19th- and 20th-century Europe},
  title        = {The Scandinavian Mission of the Sisters of Saint Joseph: A female Counter-Culture in Nordic Society},
  year         = {2014},
}