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Neuropathology in transplants in Parkinson's disease: Implications for disease pathogenesis and the future of cell therapy.

Brundin, Patrik LU and Kordower, Jeffrey H (2012) In Progress in Brain Research 200. p.221-241
Abstract
Neural transplantation is over a century old, but the modern era encompasses only the last 30-40 years. For most of this time period, research has focused on reversing disability engendered by neurologic disease and brain damage. Only recently was it recognized that the underlying neurological disease itself might negatively impact the grafted neurons. We have found that a subset of neurons within embryonic neural grafts that survive more than 10 years in Parkinson patients display Lewy bodies, a classical feature of Parkinson's disease neuropathology. Additionally, the grafted cells placed in the Parkinson's disease brain eventually downregulate the expression of dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase in a manner similar to what is... (More)
Neural transplantation is over a century old, but the modern era encompasses only the last 30-40 years. For most of this time period, research has focused on reversing disability engendered by neurologic disease and brain damage. Only recently was it recognized that the underlying neurological disease itself might negatively impact the grafted neurons. We have found that a subset of neurons within embryonic neural grafts that survive more than 10 years in Parkinson patients display Lewy bodies, a classical feature of Parkinson's disease neuropathology. Additionally, the grafted cells placed in the Parkinson's disease brain eventually downregulate the expression of dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase in a manner similar to what is seen in the substantia nigra dopamine neurons that are degenerating due to the disease. We discuss these findings in terms of how they might improve our understanding of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis and the effects they may have on the future of neural cell replacement strategies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Progress in Brain Research
volume
200
pages
221 - 241
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • PMID:23195421
  • WOS:000349319300011
  • Scopus:84870269243
ISSN
1875-7855
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-444-59575-1.00010-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fe4f8380-35e9-4e61-8c68-a214a9f5e2bf (old id 3347843)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23195421?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-01-02 10:32:12
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:28:27
@misc{fe4f8380-35e9-4e61-8c68-a214a9f5e2bf,
  abstract     = {Neural transplantation is over a century old, but the modern era encompasses only the last 30-40 years. For most of this time period, research has focused on reversing disability engendered by neurologic disease and brain damage. Only recently was it recognized that the underlying neurological disease itself might negatively impact the grafted neurons. We have found that a subset of neurons within embryonic neural grafts that survive more than 10 years in Parkinson patients display Lewy bodies, a classical feature of Parkinson's disease neuropathology. Additionally, the grafted cells placed in the Parkinson's disease brain eventually downregulate the expression of dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase in a manner similar to what is seen in the substantia nigra dopamine neurons that are degenerating due to the disease. We discuss these findings in terms of how they might improve our understanding of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis and the effects they may have on the future of neural cell replacement strategies.},
  author       = {Brundin, Patrik and Kordower, Jeffrey H},
  issn         = {1875-7855},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {221--241},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x59c5060)},
  series       = {Progress in Brain Research},
  title        = {Neuropathology in transplants in Parkinson's disease: Implications for disease pathogenesis and the future of cell therapy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-59575-1.00010-7},
  volume       = {200},
  year         = {2012},
}