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Ethical challenges for using human cells in clinical cell therapy.

Hermerén, Göran LU (2012) In Progress in Brain Research 200. p.17-40
Abstract
In this chapter, different challenges for using human cells in clinical cell therapy are identified and discussed. Several types of challenges are defined and described, with particular attention to the relation between ethical and scientific challenges. Some challenges are cell and disease specific: they are raised by research on special types of cells with certain methods in order to pave the way for cell therapies of particular diseases. But since scientific work is carried out in a societal and value-loaded context, the relations between scientific, ethical, and regulatory challenges are complex. Three theses are first discussed: there is not one fixed list of ethical challenges, some challenges are disease and cell type specific;... (More)
In this chapter, different challenges for using human cells in clinical cell therapy are identified and discussed. Several types of challenges are defined and described, with particular attention to the relation between ethical and scientific challenges. Some challenges are cell and disease specific: they are raised by research on special types of cells with certain methods in order to pave the way for cell therapies of particular diseases. But since scientific work is carried out in a societal and value-loaded context, the relations between scientific, ethical, and regulatory challenges are complex. Three theses are first discussed: there is not one fixed list of ethical challenges, some challenges are disease and cell type specific; there are challenges at all stages of the translation from bench to bedside, and the challenges are related to the various stages of translation. Moreover, experimental and ethical research needs to be integrated. Finally, a fourth thesis is suggested: if a constructive and well-argued position is desired, it is necessary to be specific not only about the scientific details but also about the value premises. Everybody is for justice, integrity, and respect for persons. But what precisely does this mean when it is applied to the choices scientists and regulators have to face in their daily work? (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Progress in Brain Research
volume
200
pages
17 - 40
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • PMID:23195413
  • WOS:000349319300003
  • Scopus:84870287396
ISSN
1875-7855
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-444-59575-1.00002-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
345ea1d4-4157-4c18-9f5f-d1b5771406a0 (old id 3347848)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23195413?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-01-02 10:34:27
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:28:38
@misc{345ea1d4-4157-4c18-9f5f-d1b5771406a0,
  abstract     = {In this chapter, different challenges for using human cells in clinical cell therapy are identified and discussed. Several types of challenges are defined and described, with particular attention to the relation between ethical and scientific challenges. Some challenges are cell and disease specific: they are raised by research on special types of cells with certain methods in order to pave the way for cell therapies of particular diseases. But since scientific work is carried out in a societal and value-loaded context, the relations between scientific, ethical, and regulatory challenges are complex. Three theses are first discussed: there is not one fixed list of ethical challenges, some challenges are disease and cell type specific; there are challenges at all stages of the translation from bench to bedside, and the challenges are related to the various stages of translation. Moreover, experimental and ethical research needs to be integrated. Finally, a fourth thesis is suggested: if a constructive and well-argued position is desired, it is necessary to be specific not only about the scientific details but also about the value premises. Everybody is for justice, integrity, and respect for persons. But what precisely does this mean when it is applied to the choices scientists and regulators have to face in their daily work?},
  author       = {Hermerén, Göran},
  issn         = {1875-7855},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {17--40},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa813708)},
  series       = {Progress in Brain Research},
  title        = {Ethical challenges for using human cells in clinical cell therapy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-59575-1.00002-8},
  volume       = {200},
  year         = {2012},
}