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Arm Lymphoedema, Shoulder Mobility and Muscle Strength after Breast Cancer Treatment – A Prospective 2-year Study

Johansson, Karin LU ; Ingvar, Christian LU ; Albertsson, Maria LU and Ekdahl, Charlotte LU (2001) In Advances in Physiotherapy 3. p.55-66
Abstract
Arm lymphoedema and impaired shoulder mobility and muscle strength are well known side-effects to breast cancer treatment. The aim of this prospective study was to follow closely and describe the arm volume, range of motion of the shoulder and muscle strength of the shoulder and hand after breast cancer treatment in order to form a basis for further studies in the area including physiotherapy intervention. Sixty-one women treated for breast cancer with axillary dissection, with or without postoperative radiotherapy, were examined preoperatively and monthly until 6 months after the operation with 1- and 2-year follow-ups. 1 month after the operation, results revealed decrease in range of motion, after 2 months increase in arm volume... (More)
Arm lymphoedema and impaired shoulder mobility and muscle strength are well known side-effects to breast cancer treatment. The aim of this prospective study was to follow closely and describe the arm volume, range of motion of the shoulder and muscle strength of the shoulder and hand after breast cancer treatment in order to form a basis for further studies in the area including physiotherapy intervention. Sixty-one women treated for breast cancer with axillary dissection, with or without postoperative radiotherapy, were examined preoperatively and monthly until 6 months after the operation with 1- and 2-year follow-ups. 1 month after the operation, results revealed decrease in range of motion, after 2 months increase in arm volume difference and after the first 6 months decrease in muscle strength of shoulder adductors, flexors and internal rotators. A greater increase in arm volume difference and decrease in shoulder abduction, flexion and external rotation were noted throughout the follow-up period for the group receiving radiotherapy to the axdefinition illa area. Postoperative physiotherapeutic management needs to pay special attention to early impairments after breast cancer treatment particularly to the group receiving radiotherapy to the axilla area. Physiotherapeutic treatment might be introduced during the period when radiotherapy is being given. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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submitted
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keywords
ARM, LYMPHOEDEMAISOMETRIC, MUSCLE, STRENGTH, MASTECTOMY, POSTOPERATIVE, RADIOTHERAPYRANGE, OF, MOTION, SHOULDER, IMPAIRMENT, SWOLLEN, WATER, DISPLACEMENT, METHOD
in
Advances in Physiotherapy
volume
3
pages
55 - 66
publisher
Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1651-1948
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1329a5e8-a974-4dad-9f9b-cc9a5593a952 (old id 3916477)
alternative location
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/apl/sphy/2001/00000003/00000002/art00003
date added to LUP
2013-07-02 14:24:39
date last changed
2016-04-16 11:03:13
@misc{1329a5e8-a974-4dad-9f9b-cc9a5593a952,
  abstract     = {Arm lymphoedema and impaired shoulder mobility and muscle strength are well known side-effects to breast cancer treatment. The aim of this prospective study was to follow closely and describe the arm volume, range of motion of the shoulder and muscle strength of the shoulder and hand after breast cancer treatment in order to form a basis for further studies in the area including physiotherapy intervention. Sixty-one women treated for breast cancer with axillary dissection, with or without postoperative radiotherapy, were examined preoperatively and monthly until 6 months after the operation with 1- and 2-year follow-ups. 1 month after the operation, results revealed decrease in range of motion, after 2 months increase in arm volume difference and after the first 6 months decrease in muscle strength of shoulder adductors, flexors and internal rotators. A greater increase in arm volume difference and decrease in shoulder abduction, flexion and external rotation were noted throughout the follow-up period for the group receiving radiotherapy to the axdefinition illa area. Postoperative physiotherapeutic management needs to pay special attention to early impairments after breast cancer treatment particularly to the group receiving radiotherapy to the axilla area. Physiotherapeutic treatment might be introduced during the period when radiotherapy is being given.},
  author       = {Johansson, Karin and Ingvar, Christian and Albertsson, Maria and Ekdahl, Charlotte},
  issn         = {1651-1948},
  keyword      = {ARM,LYMPHOEDEMAISOMETRIC,MUSCLE,STRENGTH,MASTECTOMY,POSTOPERATIVE,RADIOTHERAPYRANGE,OF,MOTION,SHOULDER,IMPAIRMENT,SWOLLEN,WATER,DISPLACEMENT,METHOD},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {55--66},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb4a3138)},
  series       = {Advances in Physiotherapy},
  title        = {Arm Lymphoedema, Shoulder Mobility and Muscle Strength after Breast Cancer Treatment – A Prospective 2-year Study},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2001},
}