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Personality psychology as the integrative study of traits and worldviews

Nilsson, Artur LU (2013) 1st World Conference of Personality, 2013
Abstract
Previous attempts to construct an integrative framework for personality psychology are primarily descriptions of what the field looks like today rather than analyses of its logical structure and

therefore threaten to reify and perpetuate the current structure of the field. I aim here to draw attention to logically important points that may help to integrate the field and suggest

potentially fruitful research paths that are unrealized due to historical contingency. My point of departure is that the crucial defining feature of personality psychology is that it studies human

beings not just as mechanical systems, but also as rational agents, whose experiences and actions are imbued with intentionality and... (More)
Previous attempts to construct an integrative framework for personality psychology are primarily descriptions of what the field looks like today rather than analyses of its logical structure and

therefore threaten to reify and perpetuate the current structure of the field. I aim here to draw attention to logically important points that may help to integrate the field and suggest

potentially fruitful research paths that are unrealized due to historical contingency. My point of departure is that the crucial defining feature of personality psychology is that it studies human

beings not just as mechanical systems, but also as rational agents, whose experiences and actions are imbued with intentionality and meaning. I argue that it follows if we take this core

feature of personality seriously that the study of personality consists of two equally basic and mutually irreducible projects: the study of traits, defined as objective patterns of behavior, and

the study of worldviews, defined as subjective sources of meaning. I argue that worldviews are, contrary to popular belief, not inherently less universal, or in other ways less basic, than

traits, although they have seldom been studied systematically, and that both universalistic and historic- cultural levels of analysis can be usefully combined with both the study of traits and

the study of worldviews. I conclude by emphasizing the importance of integration across the trait- worldview divide, as well as the nomothetic- idiothetic divide, for the development of richer

and more unified portraits of personalities. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
personality, trait, worldview, integration, framework, philosophy
conference name
1st World Conference of Personality, 2013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
97b76b5a-f347-4a6a-96bd-961d7084e797 (old id 4022153)
date added to LUP
2013-09-09 09:14:44
date last changed
2016-10-07 15:08:26
@misc{97b76b5a-f347-4a6a-96bd-961d7084e797,
  abstract     = {Previous attempts to construct an integrative framework for personality psychology are primarily descriptions of what the field looks like today rather than analyses of its logical structure and <br/><br>
therefore threaten to reify and perpetuate the current structure of the field. I aim here to draw attention to logically important points that may help to integrate the field and suggest <br/><br>
potentially fruitful research paths that are unrealized due to historical contingency. My point of departure is that the crucial defining feature of personality psychology is that it studies human <br/><br>
beings not just as mechanical systems, but also as rational agents, whose experiences and actions are imbued with intentionality and meaning. I argue that it follows if we take this core <br/><br>
feature of personality seriously that the study of personality consists of two equally basic and mutually irreducible projects: the study of traits, defined as objective patterns of behavior, and <br/><br>
the study of worldviews, defined as subjective sources of meaning. I argue that worldviews are, contrary to popular belief, not inherently less universal, or in other ways less basic, than <br/><br>
traits, although they have seldom been studied systematically, and that both universalistic and historic- cultural levels of analysis can be usefully combined with both the study of traits and <br/><br>
the study of worldviews. I conclude by emphasizing the importance of integration across the trait- worldview divide, as well as the nomothetic- idiothetic divide, for the development of richer <br/><br>
and more unified portraits of personalities.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Artur},
  keyword      = {personality,trait,worldview,integration,framework,philosophy},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Personality psychology as the integrative study of traits and worldviews},
  year         = {2013},
}