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Mind Aestheticised : Samuel Beckett's Television Plays and the Deleuzian Image

Mendelyté, Aténé LU (2012)
Abstract
This master thesis explores four television plays written and directed by Samuel Beckett: Eh Joe, Ghost Trio, ...but the clouds..., and Night and Dreams. The plays are read in accordance with the film-philosophical approach to cinema outlined in Gilles Deleuze's books on cinema. The master thesis attempts to position these plays as images in relation to the movement- and time-image as well as to the neuro-image posited by film scholar Patricia Pisters. It is argued that Beckett's plays are mentalised spaces, refoldable in a number of ways and inherently philosophical in their nature. For example, they do not present characters as just psychosocial types or aesthetic figures which one would normally encounter in the movement- and... (More)
This master thesis explores four television plays written and directed by Samuel Beckett: Eh Joe, Ghost Trio, ...but the clouds..., and Night and Dreams. The plays are read in accordance with the film-philosophical approach to cinema outlined in Gilles Deleuze's books on cinema. The master thesis attempts to position these plays as images in relation to the movement- and time-image as well as to the neuro-image posited by film scholar Patricia Pisters. It is argued that Beckett's plays are mentalised spaces, refoldable in a number of ways and inherently philosophical in their nature. For example, they do not present characters as just psychosocial types or aesthetic figures which one would normally encounter in the movement- and time-images but also as conceptual personae through which one is taught a new way of perceiving humanity. The analysis further elaborates on the question of the nature of these mental spaces, their ontology and connection to film consciousness. It is postulated that these plays present schizophrenic, affective, memory, and oneiric internal words according to the operative logic of which the screen image manifests itself which leads to the conception of the plays as proto-neuro-images, as related to but not quite yet “neuronal”. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
pages
66 pages
publisher
University of Amsterdam
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d22e161a-4056-496f-8aa4-5cd4710f0c83 (old id 4144347)
alternative location
http://dare.uva.nl/document/446870
date added to LUP
2013-11-05 13:06:33
date last changed
2016-09-26 07:59:33
@misc{d22e161a-4056-496f-8aa4-5cd4710f0c83,
  abstract     = {This master thesis explores four television plays written and directed by Samuel Beckett: Eh Joe, Ghost Trio, ...but the clouds..., and Night and Dreams. The plays are read in accordance with the film-philosophical approach to cinema outlined in Gilles Deleuze's books on cinema. The master thesis attempts to position these plays as images in relation to the movement- and time-image as well as to the neuro-image posited by film scholar Patricia Pisters. It is argued that Beckett's plays are mentalised spaces, refoldable in a number of ways and inherently philosophical in their nature. For example, they do not present characters as just psychosocial types or aesthetic figures which one would normally encounter in the movement- and time-images but also as conceptual personae through which one is taught a new way of perceiving humanity. The analysis further elaborates on the question of the nature of these mental spaces, their ontology and connection to film consciousness. It is postulated that these plays present schizophrenic, affective, memory, and oneiric internal words according to the operative logic of which the screen image manifests itself which leads to the conception of the plays as proto-neuro-images, as related to but not quite yet “neuronal”.},
  author       = {Mendelyté, Aténé},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {66},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xbc547d8)},
  title        = {Mind Aestheticised : Samuel Beckett's Television Plays and the Deleuzian Image},
  year         = {2012},
}