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PR in Fiction vs The Professional Project: Who tells the most convincing story?

Young, Philip LU (2013) BARCELONA MEETING COM#3: INTERNATIONAL PR 2013 CONFERENCE: REPRESENTING PR: IMAGES, IDENTITIES, AND INNOVATIONS p.1-13
Abstract
In most genres of fiction representations of a profession, discipline or calling must broadly resonate with the conceptions of that role held by audiences.



But very few represenations of PR practice to be found in novels written by UK-based writers draw a picture of PR activity that sits comfortably with the ”idealised” models offered by organisations such as the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, or by many standard PR textbooks.



Although by its very nature, storytelling tends towards a distorted and sensationalised discourse for dramatic or humorous effect, but it will often take care not stray too far from perceived reality.



Some novelists will draw on personal... (More)
In most genres of fiction representations of a profession, discipline or calling must broadly resonate with the conceptions of that role held by audiences.



But very few represenations of PR practice to be found in novels written by UK-based writers draw a picture of PR activity that sits comfortably with the ”idealised” models offered by organisations such as the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, or by many standard PR textbooks.



Although by its very nature, storytelling tends towards a distorted and sensationalised discourse for dramatic or humorous effect, but it will often take care not stray too far from perceived reality.



Some novelists will draw on personal experience, perhaps from their experience of working within PR (Graeme Lancaster, David Michie etc), others may have derive inspiration from their experiences as being the product in whose service PR is utilised. Some will spend time meticulously investigating their subject, others may feel that, say, the exposition of a minor character does not merit detailed research. The former may speak to practitioners directly, and both will drawn on a range of wider cultural references, from magazine or newspaper profiles to biographies of PR exponents. They may well tap into stories – perhaps mere gossip, anecdote and rumour - for dramatic inspiration. However the process works, they will engage with a broad discourse surrounding the reputation and perception of PR practice.



This paper argues that the key characteristics displayed in UK novels, ranging from serious literary fiction to so-called chick lit and science fiction, present a more more accurate representation of both what PR practitioners actually do, their characteristics and their behaviours, than the normative models held up as ”excellent” by the professional bodies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
public relations, ethics, professional practice
pages
13 pages
conference name
BARCELONA MEETING COM#3: INTERNATIONAL PR 2013 CONFERENCE: REPRESENTING PR: IMAGES, IDENTITIES, AND INNOVATIONS
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c4bd138c-564d-4110-92fd-e78aa78ccbc0 (old id 4353999)
date added to LUP
2014-03-07 15:57:39
date last changed
2016-04-16 12:09:05
@misc{c4bd138c-564d-4110-92fd-e78aa78ccbc0,
  abstract     = {In most genres of fiction representations of a profession, discipline or calling must broadly resonate with the conceptions of that role held by audiences. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
But very few represenations of PR practice to be found in novels written by UK-based writers draw a picture of PR activity that sits comfortably with the ”idealised” models offered by organisations such as the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, or by many standard PR textbooks. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Although by its very nature, storytelling tends towards a distorted and sensationalised discourse for dramatic or humorous effect, but it will often take care not stray too far from perceived reality. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Some novelists will draw on personal experience, perhaps from their experience of working within PR (Graeme Lancaster, David Michie etc), others may have derive inspiration from their experiences as being the product in whose service PR is utilised. Some will spend time meticulously investigating their subject, others may feel that, say, the exposition of a minor character does not merit detailed research. The former may speak to practitioners directly, and both will drawn on a range of wider cultural references, from magazine or newspaper profiles to biographies of PR exponents. They may well tap into stories – perhaps mere gossip, anecdote and rumour - for dramatic inspiration. However the process works, they will engage with a broad discourse surrounding the reputation and perception of PR practice.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
This paper argues that the key characteristics displayed in UK novels, ranging from serious literary fiction to so-called chick lit and science fiction, present a more more accurate representation of both what PR practitioners actually do, their characteristics and their behaviours, than the normative models held up as ”excellent” by the professional bodies.},
  author       = {Young, Philip},
  keyword      = {public relations,ethics,professional practice},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--13},
  title        = {PR in Fiction vs The Professional Project: Who tells the most convincing story?},
  year         = {2013},
}