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Innovative speed management tools: Summary report on research area 3

Varhelyi, Andras LU (1998) In Working Paper R 3.3.1 in the EU-project – MASTER
Abstract
This report is summary of research area 3: Speed management tools and strategies of project MASTER (Managing Speeds of Traffic on European Roads) under the Transport RTD Programme of the 4th Framework Programme of the European Commission. The report describes the findings of a literature review on various ATT (Advanced Transport Telematics) and traditional (non-ATT) methods for speed management. Besides traditional speed management measures the following ATT systems were discussed: a) variable speed limit signs, b) feedback signs, c) automatic speed cameras, d) in-car information, e) in-car feedback, f) in-car speed supervisor, g) in-car speed limiters. The outcomes of the literature review were used to select and test the effectiveness of... (More)
This report is summary of research area 3: Speed management tools and strategies of project MASTER (Managing Speeds of Traffic on European Roads) under the Transport RTD Programme of the 4th Framework Programme of the European Commission. The report describes the findings of a literature review on various ATT (Advanced Transport Telematics) and traditional (non-ATT) methods for speed management. Besides traditional speed management measures the following ATT systems were discussed: a) variable speed limit signs, b) feedback signs, c) automatic speed cameras, d) in-car information, e) in-car feedback, f) in-car speed supervisor, g) in-car speed limiters. The outcomes of the literature review were used to select and test the effectiveness of the most promising systems on a driving simulator In the experiment drivers encountered curves (radius 100 or 200 metres) that were treated with one of four implementations: a) transverse bars, b) advisory speed signs, c) in-car visual advice and d) in-car automated speed control. The results revealed that automatic speed control surpassed all the other systems in terms of effectively reducing speed on approach to curves. In terms of user acceptability however, this system was least liked. In a second simulator experiment the effects of different speed management systems (an advisory system and a fixed and dynamic speed limiter) were investigated. Speed control was successful in reducing excessive speed. Speed control also produced better adapted speeds on curve negotiation and in areas with vulnerable road users. Speed variance was also reduced under speed control. The advisory system also appears to have some success in reducing speed. The advisory system worked almost as well as the dynamic speed limiter in potentially hazardous situations. However, there were also some negative effects of the speed control systems in terms of shorter headways in car following and relatively late braking. No effects on reported driver workload were found. The informative system had higher acceptance, even if decreased after experiencing it. The impacts of a variable speed limiter were studied in field trials in real traffic conditions in three “regional typical” European countries using an instrumented car where all measuring equipment was hidden. The results revealed that the speed limiter reduced speeds significantly in free driving conditions, decreased speed variance and approach speeds at curves and intersections. It also increased travel time. The drivers' acceptance of the device increased after the test drive but they still generally felt that speed limiter caused frustration, stress and impatience. The findings from the different activities are summarised and recommendations for continuous work are given. (Less)
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Working Paper R 3.3.1 in the EU-project – MASTER
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55 pages
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English
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b18bbd47-a065-4c7b-a54e-4221bde0d72f (old id 4463817)
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@misc{b18bbd47-a065-4c7b-a54e-4221bde0d72f,
  abstract     = {This report is summary of research area 3: Speed management tools and strategies of project MASTER (Managing Speeds of Traffic on European Roads) under the Transport RTD Programme of the 4th Framework Programme of the European Commission. The report describes the findings of a literature review on various ATT (Advanced Transport Telematics) and traditional (non-ATT) methods for speed management. Besides traditional speed management measures the following ATT systems were discussed: a) variable speed limit signs, b) feedback signs, c) automatic speed cameras, d) in-car information, e) in-car feedback, f) in-car speed supervisor, g) in-car speed limiters. The outcomes of the literature review were used to select and test the effectiveness of the most promising systems on a driving simulator In the experiment drivers encountered curves (radius 100 or 200 metres) that were treated with one of four implementations: a) transverse bars, b) advisory speed signs, c) in-car visual advice and d) in-car automated speed control. The results revealed that automatic speed control surpassed all the other systems in terms of effectively reducing speed on approach to curves. In terms of user acceptability however, this system was least liked. In a second simulator experiment the effects of different speed management systems (an advisory system and a fixed and dynamic speed limiter) were investigated. Speed control was successful in reducing excessive speed. Speed control also produced better adapted speeds on curve negotiation and in areas with vulnerable road users. Speed variance was also reduced under speed control. The advisory system also appears to have some success in reducing speed. The advisory system worked almost as well as the dynamic speed limiter in potentially hazardous situations. However, there were also some negative effects of the speed control systems in terms of shorter headways in car following and relatively late braking. No effects on reported driver workload were found. The informative system had higher acceptance, even if decreased after experiencing it. The impacts of a variable speed limiter were studied in field trials in real traffic conditions in three “regional typical” European countries using an instrumented car where all measuring equipment was hidden. The results revealed that the speed limiter reduced speeds significantly in free driving conditions, decreased speed variance and approach speeds at curves and intersections. It also increased travel time. The drivers' acceptance of the device increased after the test drive but they still generally felt that speed limiter caused frustration, stress and impatience. The findings from the different activities are summarised and recommendations for continuous work are given.},
  author       = {Varhelyi, Andras},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {55},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9dde958)},
  series       = {Working Paper R 3.3.1 in the EU-project – MASTER},
  title        = {Innovative speed management tools: Summary report on research area 3},
  year         = {1998},
}