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The great escape: how exoplanets and smaller bodies desert dying stars

Veras, Dimitri; Wyatt, Mark C; Mustill, Alexander LU ; Bonsor, Amy and Eldridge, John J (2011) In Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 417(3). p.2104-2123
Abstract
Mounting discoveries of extrasolar planets orbiting post-main-sequence stars motivate studies to understand the fate of these planets. In the traditional 'adiabatic' approximation, a secondary's eccentricity remains constant during stellar mass-loss. Here, we remove this approximation, investigate the full two-body point-mass problem with isotropic mass-loss, and illustrate the resulting dynamical evolution. The magnitude and duration of a star's mass-loss combined with a secondary's initial orbital characteristics might provoke ejection, modest eccentricity pumping, or even circularization of the orbit. We conclude that Oort Clouds and wide-separation planets may be dynamically ejected from 1-7 M☉ parent stars during AGB evolution. The... (More)
Mounting discoveries of extrasolar planets orbiting post-main-sequence stars motivate studies to understand the fate of these planets. In the traditional 'adiabatic' approximation, a secondary's eccentricity remains constant during stellar mass-loss. Here, we remove this approximation, investigate the full two-body point-mass problem with isotropic mass-loss, and illustrate the resulting dynamical evolution. The magnitude and duration of a star's mass-loss combined with a secondary's initial orbital characteristics might provoke ejection, modest eccentricity pumping, or even circularization of the orbit. We conclude that Oort Clouds and wide-separation planets may be dynamically ejected from 1-7 M☉ parent stars during AGB evolution. The vast majority of planetary material that survives a supernova from a 7-20 M☉ progenitor will be dynamically ejected from the system, placing limits on the existence of first-generation pulsar planets. Planets around >20 M☉ black hole progenitors may easily survive or readily be ejected depending on the core collapse and superwind models applied. Material ejected during stellar evolution might contribute significantly to the free-floating planetary population. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Astrophysics - Earth and Planetary Astrophysics, Astrophysics - Solar and Stellar Astrophysics, Oort Cloud, Physics - Classical Physics, planet-star interactions, planets and satellites: dynamical evolution and stability, stars: AGB and post-AGB, stars: evolution, supernovae: general
in
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
volume
417
issue
3
pages
2104 - 2123
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • Scopus:80055102444
ISSN
1365-2966
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19393.x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
3ed11226-12e7-47ab-bc5d-11592ef097ba (old id 4500277)
date added to LUP
2014-06-25 15:09:34
date last changed
2016-11-27 04:31:39
@misc{3ed11226-12e7-47ab-bc5d-11592ef097ba,
  abstract     = {Mounting discoveries of extrasolar planets orbiting post-main-sequence stars motivate studies to understand the fate of these planets. In the traditional 'adiabatic' approximation, a secondary's eccentricity remains constant during stellar mass-loss. Here, we remove this approximation, investigate the full two-body point-mass problem with isotropic mass-loss, and illustrate the resulting dynamical evolution. The magnitude and duration of a star's mass-loss combined with a secondary's initial orbital characteristics might provoke ejection, modest eccentricity pumping, or even circularization of the orbit. We conclude that Oort Clouds and wide-separation planets may be dynamically ejected from 1-7 M☉ parent stars during AGB evolution. The vast majority of planetary material that survives a supernova from a 7-20 M☉ progenitor will be dynamically ejected from the system, placing limits on the existence of first-generation pulsar planets. Planets around >20 M☉ black hole progenitors may easily survive or readily be ejected depending on the core collapse and superwind models applied. Material ejected during stellar evolution might contribute significantly to the free-floating planetary population.},
  author       = {Veras, Dimitri and Wyatt, Mark C and Mustill, Alexander and Bonsor, Amy and Eldridge, John J},
  issn         = {1365-2966},
  keyword      = {Astrophysics - Earth and Planetary Astrophysics,Astrophysics - Solar and Stellar Astrophysics,Oort Cloud,Physics - Classical Physics,planet-star interactions,planets and satellites: dynamical evolution and stability,stars: AGB and post-AGB,stars: evolution,supernovae: general},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {2104--2123},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8d3eee0)},
  series       = {Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
  title        = {The great escape: how exoplanets and smaller bodies desert dying stars},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19393.x},
  volume       = {417},
  year         = {2011},
}