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Effects of gut microbiota on obesity and atherosclerosis via modulation of inflammation and lipid metabolism

Caesar, R.; Fåk, Frida LU and Backhed, F. (2010) In Journal of Internal Medicine 268(4). p.320-328
Abstract
Recent studies have revealed a close relationship between inflammatory and metabolic pathways, and inflammation is now recognized to have a major role in obesity and metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. The human body is home to a large number of distinct microbial communities, with the densest population in the distal gut (the gut microbiota). Bacteria have long been known to activate inflammatory pathways, and recent data demonstrate that the gut microbiota may affect lipid metabolism and function as an environmental factor that influences the development of obesity and related diseases. Here, we review how the gut microbiota may affect metabolic diseases by activating the innate immune system.
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Lipid Metabolism/*physiology, Intestinal Absorption, Innate, Immunity, Humans, Gastrointestinal Tract/immunology/*microbiology, Atherosclerosis/immunology/*microbiology, Biological Transport, Lipopolysaccharides/metabolism, Metagenome/*physiology, Obesity/immunology/*microbiology, Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism
in
Journal of Internal Medicine
volume
268
issue
4
pages
320 - 328
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • Scopus:77956310020
ISSN
1365-2796
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2796.2010.02270.x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
5ef86c04-484b-4829-b6cb-eb4eb629e79e (old id 4616744)
date added to LUP
2016-01-27 09:30:30
date last changed
2016-10-30 04:35:40
@misc{5ef86c04-484b-4829-b6cb-eb4eb629e79e,
  abstract     = {Recent studies have revealed a close relationship between inflammatory and metabolic pathways, and inflammation is now recognized to have a major role in obesity and metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. The human body is home to a large number of distinct microbial communities, with the densest population in the distal gut (the gut microbiota). Bacteria have long been known to activate inflammatory pathways, and recent data demonstrate that the gut microbiota may affect lipid metabolism and function as an environmental factor that influences the development of obesity and related diseases. Here, we review how the gut microbiota may affect metabolic diseases by activating the innate immune system.},
  author       = {Caesar, R. and Fåk, Frida and Backhed, F.},
  issn         = {1365-2796},
  keyword      = {Lipid Metabolism/*physiology,Intestinal Absorption,Innate,Immunity,Humans,Gastrointestinal Tract/immunology/*microbiology,Atherosclerosis/immunology/*microbiology,Biological Transport,Lipopolysaccharides/metabolism,Metagenome/*physiology,Obesity/immunology/*microbiology,Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {320--328},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb5be3b0)},
  series       = {Journal of Internal Medicine},
  title        = {Effects of gut microbiota on obesity and atherosclerosis via modulation of inflammation and lipid metabolism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2010.02270.x},
  volume       = {268},
  year         = {2010},
}