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Cerebrospinal Fluid Stanniocalcin-1 as a Biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders

Shahim, Pashtun; Blennow, Kaj LU ; Johansson, Per LU ; Svensson, Johan LU ; Lista, Simone; Hampel, Harald; Andersson, Leif Christer and Zetterberg, Henrik LU (2016) In NeuroMolecular Medicine
Abstract

Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) is a nerve cell-enriched protein involved in intracellular calcium homeostasis regulation. Changes in calcium regulation are hypothesized to play a role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The expression of STC-1 increases in response to ischemic stroke, but whether it is altered in neurodegenerative disorder, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD), has not been investigated before. We measured STC-1 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from a total of 163 individuals including AD, prodromal AD (pAD), mixed AD, stable mild cognitive impairment (sMCI), and diagnoses of other dementia than AD, as well as cognitively normal controls (CNC) enrolled at academic centers in France and Sweden. STC-1... (More)

Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) is a nerve cell-enriched protein involved in intracellular calcium homeostasis regulation. Changes in calcium regulation are hypothesized to play a role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The expression of STC-1 increases in response to ischemic stroke, but whether it is altered in neurodegenerative disorder, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD), has not been investigated before. We measured STC-1 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from a total of 163 individuals including AD, prodromal AD (pAD), mixed AD, stable mild cognitive impairment (sMCI), and diagnoses of other dementia than AD, as well as cognitively normal controls (CNC) enrolled at academic centers in France and Sweden. STC-1 concentration was reliably measureable in all CSF samples and was significantly increased in the initial exploratory cohort of neurochemically enriched AD patients versus AD biomarker-negative controls. In the second cohort, STC-1 was increased in AD versus pAD, and other dementia disorders, but the difference was not statistically significant. In the third cohort, there was no significant difference in STC-1 concentration between AD and CNC; however, STC-1 concentration was significantly decreased in patients with other dementia disorders compared with AD and CNC. Taken together, CSF STC-1 showed an increasing trend in AD, but the findings were not consistent across the three study cohorts. In contrast, CSF STC-1 concentrations were reduced in patients with dementia diagnoses other than AD, as compared with both AD patients and CNC. The findings from these studies suggest CSF STC-1 as a potential biomarker in differential diagnosis of dementias.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
in
NeuroMolecular Medicine
publisher
Humana Press
ISSN
1535-1084
DOI
10.1007/s12017-016-8439-1
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
471fff32-8bcf-429a-b552-7c7c5295f378
date added to LUP
2016-09-29 16:17:08
date last changed
2016-11-30 15:44:58
@misc{471fff32-8bcf-429a-b552-7c7c5295f378,
  abstract     = {<p>Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) is a nerve cell-enriched protein involved in intracellular calcium homeostasis regulation. Changes in calcium regulation are hypothesized to play a role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The expression of STC-1 increases in response to ischemic stroke, but whether it is altered in neurodegenerative disorder, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD), has not been investigated before. We measured STC-1 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from a total of 163 individuals including AD, prodromal AD (pAD), mixed AD, stable mild cognitive impairment (sMCI), and diagnoses of other dementia than AD, as well as cognitively normal controls (CNC) enrolled at academic centers in France and Sweden. STC-1 concentration was reliably measureable in all CSF samples and was significantly increased in the initial exploratory cohort of neurochemically enriched AD patients versus AD biomarker-negative controls. In the second cohort, STC-1 was increased in AD versus pAD, and other dementia disorders, but the difference was not statistically significant. In the third cohort, there was no significant difference in STC-1 concentration between AD and CNC; however, STC-1 concentration was significantly decreased in patients with other dementia disorders compared with AD and CNC. Taken together, CSF STC-1 showed an increasing trend in AD, but the findings were not consistent across the three study cohorts. In contrast, CSF STC-1 concentrations were reduced in patients with dementia diagnoses other than AD, as compared with both AD patients and CNC. The findings from these studies suggest CSF STC-1 as a potential biomarker in differential diagnosis of dementias.</p>},
  author       = {Shahim, Pashtun and Blennow, Kaj and Johansson, Per and Svensson, Johan and Lista, Simone and Hampel, Harald and Andersson, Leif Christer and Zetterberg, Henrik},
  issn         = {1535-1084},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x97d9708)},
  series       = {NeuroMolecular Medicine},
  title        = {Cerebrospinal Fluid Stanniocalcin-1 as a Biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12017-016-8439-1},
  year         = {2016},
}