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A population-based registry study evaluating surgery in newly diagnosed uterine cancer

Borgfeldt, Christer LU ; Kalapotharakos, Grigorios LU ; ASCIUTTO, CHRISTINE LU ; Löfgren, Mats and Högberg, Thomas LU (2016) In Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 95(8). p.901-911
Abstract

Introduction: The aim was to evaluate surgical treatment of newly diagnosed uterine cancer in a Swedish population. Material and methods: Data in the GynOp registry from 2008 to 2014 were analyzed. Results: In total, 3443 cases were included: 430 (12%) were robotic-assisted laparoscopic, 272 (8%) laparoscopic, and 2741 (80%) abdominal operations. There was an increasing trend in minimally invasive surgery from 2008 to 2014 (41%). Women with lymph nodes removed in the robotic-assisted laparoscopic group experienced less blood loss (mean 105 vs. 377 mL), shorter length of hospital stay (2.4 vs. 4.1 days), and fewer days to normal activities of daily living (6.5 vs. 12.7 days) (all p <0.001) compared with the abdominal group, but... (More)

Introduction: The aim was to evaluate surgical treatment of newly diagnosed uterine cancer in a Swedish population. Material and methods: Data in the GynOp registry from 2008 to 2014 were analyzed. Results: In total, 3443 cases were included: 430 (12%) were robotic-assisted laparoscopic, 272 (8%) laparoscopic, and 2741 (80%) abdominal operations. There was an increasing trend in minimally invasive surgery from 2008 to 2014 (41%). Women with lymph nodes removed in the robotic-assisted laparoscopic group experienced less blood loss (mean 105 vs. 377 mL), shorter length of hospital stay (2.4 vs. 4.1 days), and fewer days to normal activities of daily living (6.5 vs. 12.7 days) (all p <0.001) compared with the abdominal group, but operating time did not differ. Similar results were found in women with no lymph node removal and in women with body mass index ≥35. Major complications during hospital stay, reoperations, and time to work were less in both minimally invasive groups. More lymph nodes were retrieved in the abdominal (mean 34.4) than in the robotic-assisted laparoscopic (mean 26.0) group, but the number of women with lymph node metastases did not differ, totaling 211/960 (21.9%; 95% CI 19.4-24.7%). Isolated para-aortic lymph node metastases were found in 3.9% (95% CI 2.4-5.6%) of women. Conclusions: Minimally invasive surgery in uterine cancer patients reduces days to normal activities of daily living, number of days to return to work, length of hospital stay, and blood loss in patients without and with lymph node dissection and in obese patients.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cancer, Hysterectomy, Laparoscopy, Lymphadenectomy, Obesity, Surgical techniques, Training
in
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
volume
95
issue
8
pages
901 - 911
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84971215728
ISSN
0001-6349
DOI
10.1111/aogs.12918
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
48d9b43a-62ee-4216-9e94-fc88d766c73a
date added to LUP
2016-06-16 12:00:34
date last changed
2016-09-20 03:06:14
@misc{48d9b43a-62ee-4216-9e94-fc88d766c73a,
  abstract     = {<p>Introduction: The aim was to evaluate surgical treatment of newly diagnosed uterine cancer in a Swedish population. Material and methods: Data in the GynOp registry from 2008 to 2014 were analyzed. Results: In total, 3443 cases were included: 430 (12%) were robotic-assisted laparoscopic, 272 (8%) laparoscopic, and 2741 (80%) abdominal operations. There was an increasing trend in minimally invasive surgery from 2008 to 2014 (41%). Women with lymph nodes removed in the robotic-assisted laparoscopic group experienced less blood loss (mean 105 vs. 377 mL), shorter length of hospital stay (2.4 vs. 4.1 days), and fewer days to normal activities of daily living (6.5 vs. 12.7 days) (all p &lt;0.001) compared with the abdominal group, but operating time did not differ. Similar results were found in women with no lymph node removal and in women with body mass index ≥35. Major complications during hospital stay, reoperations, and time to work were less in both minimally invasive groups. More lymph nodes were retrieved in the abdominal (mean 34.4) than in the robotic-assisted laparoscopic (mean 26.0) group, but the number of women with lymph node metastases did not differ, totaling 211/960 (21.9%; 95% CI 19.4-24.7%). Isolated para-aortic lymph node metastases were found in 3.9% (95% CI 2.4-5.6%) of women. Conclusions: Minimally invasive surgery in uterine cancer patients reduces days to normal activities of daily living, number of days to return to work, length of hospital stay, and blood loss in patients without and with lymph node dissection and in obese patients.</p>},
  author       = {Borgfeldt, Christer and Kalapotharakos, Grigorios and ASCIUTTO, CHRISTINE and Löfgren, Mats and Högberg, Thomas},
  issn         = {0001-6349},
  keyword      = {Cancer,Hysterectomy,Laparoscopy,Lymphadenectomy,Obesity,Surgical techniques,Training},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {901--911},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb60d1f8)},
  series       = {Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {A population-based registry study evaluating surgery in newly diagnosed uterine cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aogs.12918},
  volume       = {95},
  year         = {2016},
}