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F0 Peak Timing, Height, and Shape as Independent Features

Ambrazaitis, Gilbert LU and Frid, Johan LU (2014) The 4th International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages In Proc. of The 4th International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages, Nijmegen, The Netherlands p.138-142
Abstract
A considerable amount of evidence from several intonation languages (e.g., German, English, Italian) supports the idea that F0 peak timing, height, and shape variables form a feature bundle, which is used to encode two-fold intonational (e.g., sentence-level) pitch accent distinctions such as L+H* vs. L*+H. The three types of features in the bundle can be weighted differently but the outcome seems to be functionally equivalent. In this sense, they are ‘substitute phonetic features’. This paper presents data from two distinct prosodic dialect types of Swedish, a pitch-accent language, suggesting that these F0 variables can also be used independently of each other in order to encode two different contrasts (i.e., a three-fold contrast), each... (More)
A considerable amount of evidence from several intonation languages (e.g., German, English, Italian) supports the idea that F0 peak timing, height, and shape variables form a feature bundle, which is used to encode two-fold intonational (e.g., sentence-level) pitch accent distinctions such as L+H* vs. L*+H. The three types of features in the bundle can be weighted differently but the outcome seems to be functionally equivalent. In this sense, they are ‘substitute phonetic features’. This paper presents data from two distinct prosodic dialect types of Swedish, a pitch-accent language, suggesting that these F0 variables can also be used independently of each other in order to encode two different contrasts (i.e., a three-fold contrast), each of which phonetically and functionally related to the L+H* vs. L*+H distinction in an intonation language. For Central Swedish, we observe two peak raising strategies which go along with differently shaped rises: ‘extending’ (= faster rise) and ‘shifting’ (= slower rise), which tend to be used to signal ‘speaker-related’ emphasis (e.g., ‘surprise’) or ‘messagerelated’ emphasis (e.g., ‘correction’), respectively. For Southern Swedish, we observe an ‘extended’ peak and an ‘extended and delayed’ peak. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Intonation, prosody, focal accent, word accent, Swedish, emphasis, paralinguistic
in
Proc. of The 4th International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
editor
Gussenhoven, Carlos; Chen, Yiya and Dediu, Dan
pages
5 pages
publisher
ISCA
conference name
The 4th International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages
project
Function- and production-based modeling of Swedish prosody
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2ccdd029-e830-462e-a1b6-4db18598eaec (old id 5041741)
alternative location
http://www.isca-speech.org/archive/tal_2014/tl14_138.html
date added to LUP
2015-02-02 13:19:59
date last changed
2016-04-16 09:00:46
@misc{2ccdd029-e830-462e-a1b6-4db18598eaec,
  abstract     = {A considerable amount of evidence from several intonation languages (e.g., German, English, Italian) supports the idea that F0 peak timing, height, and shape variables form a feature bundle, which is used to encode two-fold intonational (e.g., sentence-level) pitch accent distinctions such as L+H* vs. L*+H. The three types of features in the bundle can be weighted differently but the outcome seems to be functionally equivalent. In this sense, they are ‘substitute phonetic features’. This paper presents data from two distinct prosodic dialect types of Swedish, a pitch-accent language, suggesting that these F0 variables can also be used independently of each other in order to encode two different contrasts (i.e., a three-fold contrast), each of which phonetically and functionally related to the L+H* vs. L*+H distinction in an intonation language. For Central Swedish, we observe two peak raising strategies which go along with differently shaped rises: ‘extending’ (= faster rise) and ‘shifting’ (= slower rise), which tend to be used to signal ‘speaker-related’ emphasis (e.g., ‘surprise’) or ‘messagerelated’ emphasis (e.g., ‘correction’), respectively. For Southern Swedish, we observe an ‘extended’ peak and an ‘extended and delayed’ peak.},
  author       = {Ambrazaitis, Gilbert and Frid, Johan},
  editor       = {Gussenhoven, Carlos and Chen, Yiya and Dediu, Dan},
  keyword      = {Intonation,prosody,focal accent,word accent,Swedish,emphasis,paralinguistic},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {138--142},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x80f3220)},
  series       = {Proc. of The 4th International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages, Nijmegen, The Netherlands},
  title        = {F0 Peak Timing, Height, and Shape as Independent Features},
  year         = {2014},
}