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Adenovirus infection enhances in vitro adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae

Håkansson, Anders P LU ; Kidd, A; Wadell, G; Sabharwal, H and Svanborg, C LU (1994) In Infection and Immunity 62(7). p.14-2707
Abstract

Viruses are thought to facilitate bacterial infections of the respiratory tract, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study analyzed the effect of adenovirus on bacterial adherence to human respiratory tract epithelial cells. The human lung carcinoma cell line A549 was infected with adenovirus of types 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 9. At a multiplicity of infection of 75 particles per cell, cytopathic effects occurred in 75 to 100% of the cells within 48 h. The virus-infected cells were harvested at various times after infection and analyzed for the ability to bind strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adenovirus (types 1, 2, 3, and 5) commonly causing respiratory tract infections increased the binding of... (More)

Viruses are thought to facilitate bacterial infections of the respiratory tract, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study analyzed the effect of adenovirus on bacterial adherence to human respiratory tract epithelial cells. The human lung carcinoma cell line A549 was infected with adenovirus of types 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 9. At a multiplicity of infection of 75 particles per cell, cytopathic effects occurred in 75 to 100% of the cells within 48 h. The virus-infected cells were harvested at various times after infection and analyzed for the ability to bind strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adenovirus (types 1, 2, 3, and 5) commonly causing respiratory tract infections increased the binding of adherent S. pneumoniae strains to the cells. This effect was not seen for other adenovirus types. Adenovirus infection did not change the adherence of cells of poorly adhering strains of S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae. The increase in adherence of S. pneumoniae could be inhibited by the DNA synthesis inhibitor cytosine arabinofuranoside, which is known to block the late phase of the adenovirus infection. When electron microscopy was used, there was no evidence that virus particles bound directly to bacteria. Adherence was not affected by pretreatment of the cells with virus particles or viral proteins. This suggested that adenovirus infection upregulated receptors for S. pneumoniae. The increased attachment may be one mechanism by which viruses precondition the respiratory mucosa for bacterial infection.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adenoviridae, Adenoviridae Infections, Bacterial Adhesion, Capsid, Capsid Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Cytarabine, Epithelium, Humans, Nasopharynx, Pneumococcal Infections, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Virus Replication
in
Infection and Immunity
volume
62
issue
7
pages
8 pages
publisher
American Society for Microbiology
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0028356434
ISSN
0019-9567
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5380e65b-61bb-4b0a-8391-75d83dddafd6
date added to LUP
2016-05-21 11:39:59
date last changed
2016-08-02 10:23:36
@misc{5380e65b-61bb-4b0a-8391-75d83dddafd6,
  abstract     = {<p>Viruses are thought to facilitate bacterial infections of the respiratory tract, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study analyzed the effect of adenovirus on bacterial adherence to human respiratory tract epithelial cells. The human lung carcinoma cell line A549 was infected with adenovirus of types 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 9. At a multiplicity of infection of 75 particles per cell, cytopathic effects occurred in 75 to 100% of the cells within 48 h. The virus-infected cells were harvested at various times after infection and analyzed for the ability to bind strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adenovirus (types 1, 2, 3, and 5) commonly causing respiratory tract infections increased the binding of adherent S. pneumoniae strains to the cells. This effect was not seen for other adenovirus types. Adenovirus infection did not change the adherence of cells of poorly adhering strains of S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae. The increase in adherence of S. pneumoniae could be inhibited by the DNA synthesis inhibitor cytosine arabinofuranoside, which is known to block the late phase of the adenovirus infection. When electron microscopy was used, there was no evidence that virus particles bound directly to bacteria. Adherence was not affected by pretreatment of the cells with virus particles or viral proteins. This suggested that adenovirus infection upregulated receptors for S. pneumoniae. The increased attachment may be one mechanism by which viruses precondition the respiratory mucosa for bacterial infection.</p>},
  author       = {Håkansson, Anders P and Kidd, A and Wadell, G and Sabharwal, H and Svanborg, C},
  issn         = {0019-9567},
  keyword      = {Adenoviridae,Adenoviridae Infections,Bacterial Adhesion,Capsid,Capsid Proteins,Cells, Cultured,Cytarabine,Epithelium,Humans,Nasopharynx,Pneumococcal Infections,Streptococcus pneumoniae,Virus Replication},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {14--2707},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8ee8ca0)},
  series       = {Infection and Immunity},
  title        = {Adenovirus infection enhances in vitro adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {1994},
}