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The Journey of a Monarch: From Good King to Tyrant

Nilsson, Astrid LU (2014) Movement and Arrest in Early Modern Culture
Abstract
In Venice, in the early summer of 1540, the last Swedish Catholic archbishop Johannes Magnus (1488-1544) finished a major work of history, entitled Historia de omnibus Gothorum Sueonumque regibus, the History of All the Kings of the Goths and the Swedes. In his work, the exiled archbishop depicted over 200 kings, starting with the son of Noah and ending with Gustavus Vasa. Many of the kings ruled Sweden, others the descendants of the Goths who were said to have once left Sweden for the continent.

Most of the kings are portrayed as brave and/or wise, some of them as terrible tyrants. Normally, they are consistent in their behaviour: kings introduced as good kings rule their people wisely and benignly, while kings presented as... (More)
In Venice, in the early summer of 1540, the last Swedish Catholic archbishop Johannes Magnus (1488-1544) finished a major work of history, entitled Historia de omnibus Gothorum Sueonumque regibus, the History of All the Kings of the Goths and the Swedes. In his work, the exiled archbishop depicted over 200 kings, starting with the son of Noah and ending with Gustavus Vasa. Many of the kings ruled Sweden, others the descendants of the Goths who were said to have once left Sweden for the continent.

Most of the kings are portrayed as brave and/or wise, some of them as terrible tyrants. Normally, they are consistent in their behaviour: kings introduced as good kings rule their people wisely and benignly, while kings presented as tyrants are cruel to their subjects and lay waste to their country.

There is, however, another category: that of the good, brave and wise king who eventually becomes a tyrant. A striking case i s that of the Ostrogothic king Theoderic (the Great). The depiction of him begins in his early years at the court at Constantinople, and finishes in Itay, where he was to become king. For a long time, Theoderic is depicted as an excellent and truly heroic monarch, but he changes for the worse, and finishes as a tyrant. This paper discusses Johannes Magnus’ depiction of King Theoderic and studies the journey of his life, from Constantinople to Italy, from good king to fully fledged tyrant. (Less)
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type
Contribution to conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
Theoderic the Great, Johannes Magnus, Historia de omnibus Gothorum Sueonumque regibus, tyrants, kingship
conference name
Movement and Arrest in Early Modern Culture
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b1bd1a7a-de53-484b-b3ff-158daf959a65 (old id 5467290)
date added to LUP
2015-06-08 16:18:58
date last changed
2016-04-16 12:10:44
@misc{b1bd1a7a-de53-484b-b3ff-158daf959a65,
  abstract     = {In Venice, in the early summer of 1540, the last Swedish Catholic archbishop Johannes Magnus (1488-1544) finished a major work of history, entitled Historia de omnibus Gothorum Sueonumque regibus, the History of All the Kings of the Goths and the Swedes. In his work, the exiled archbishop depicted over 200 kings, starting with the son of Noah and ending with Gustavus Vasa. Many of the kings ruled Sweden, others the descendants of the Goths who were said to have once left Sweden for the continent.<br/><br>
Most of the kings are portrayed as brave and/or wise, some of them as terrible tyrants. Normally, they are consistent in their behaviour: kings introduced as good kings rule their people wisely and benignly, while kings presented as tyrants are cruel to their subjects and lay waste to their country. <br/><br>
There is, however, another category: that of the good, brave and wise king who eventually becomes a tyrant. A striking case i s that of the Ostrogothic king Theoderic (the Great). The depiction of him begins in his early years at the court at Constantinople, and finishes in Itay, where he was to become king. For a long time, Theoderic is depicted as an excellent and truly heroic monarch, but he changes for the worse, and finishes as a tyrant. This paper discusses Johannes Magnus’ depiction of King Theoderic and studies the journey of his life, from Constantinople to Italy, from good king to fully fledged tyrant.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Astrid},
  keyword      = {Theoderic the Great,Johannes Magnus,Historia de omnibus Gothorum Sueonumque regibus,tyrants,kingship},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {The Journey of a Monarch: From Good King to Tyrant},
  year         = {2014},
}