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The internet as a civic space

Dahlgren, Peter LU (2015) In Handbook of Digital Politics p.17-17
Abstract
To talk about the internet as a civic space requires some preliminary conceptualization; thus, first I briefly discuss two models of democracy – elitist and republican – to show that the ideals of civic participation can vary considerably. This is illuminated by a discussion of the role of the net in electoral and alternative politics. From there I approach civic space through two key concepts: civil society and the public sphere. I underscore the analytic importance of power relations in understanding the extent and character of participation (and exclusion). Thereafter I turn to research findings and debates on internet and political participation, looking at the arguments of ‘enthusiasts’ and ‘sceptics’. I claim that it is essential to... (More)
To talk about the internet as a civic space requires some preliminary conceptualization; thus, first I briefly discuss two models of democracy – elitist and republican – to show that the ideals of civic participation can vary considerably. This is illuminated by a discussion of the role of the net in electoral and alternative politics. From there I approach civic space through two key concepts: civil society and the public sphere. I underscore the analytic importance of power relations in understanding the extent and character of participation (and exclusion). Thereafter I turn to research findings and debates on internet and political participation, looking at the arguments of ‘enthusiasts’ and ‘sceptics’. I claim that it is essential to grasp the various contingencies, manifested as dynamic configurations, that impact on how the internet is used. In this regard the political economy, as well as the technical architecture of the net, loom large. In socio-cultural terms, the net has become a historically new habitus for political participation. Lastly, I offer the framework of civic cultures as a way of empirically and critically analysing concrete situations of the internet as a civic space. The chapter concludes with some proposals for future research. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
innovation and technology, innovation policy, technology and ict, politics and public policy, public choice
in
Handbook of Digital Politics
editor
Coleman, Stephen and Frenlon, Deen
pages
34 pages
publisher
Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84957975385
ISBN
9781782548751
DOI
10.4337/9781782548768
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
54f7b147-34d1-4fe8-8a74-a10ca473fce2
date added to LUP
2016-05-23 09:11:19
date last changed
2016-10-13 05:09:19
@misc{54f7b147-34d1-4fe8-8a74-a10ca473fce2,
  abstract     = {To talk about the internet as a civic space requires some preliminary conceptualization; thus, first I briefly discuss two models of democracy – elitist and republican – to show that the ideals of civic participation can vary considerably. This is illuminated by a discussion of the role of the net in electoral and alternative politics. From there I approach civic space through two key concepts: civil society and the public sphere. I underscore the analytic importance of power relations in understanding the extent and character of participation (and exclusion). Thereafter I turn to research findings and debates on internet and political participation, looking at the arguments of ‘enthusiasts’ and ‘sceptics’. I claim that it is essential to grasp the various contingencies, manifested as dynamic configurations, that impact on how the internet is used. In this regard the political economy, as well as the technical architecture of the net, loom large. In socio-cultural terms, the net has become a historically new habitus for political participation. Lastly, I offer the framework of civic cultures as a way of empirically and critically analysing concrete situations of the internet as a civic space. The chapter concludes with some proposals for future research.},
  author       = {Dahlgren, Peter},
  editor       = {Coleman, Stephen and Frenlon, Deen},
  isbn         = {9781782548751},
  keyword      = {innovation and technology,innovation policy,technology and ict,politics and public policy,public choice},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {17--17},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb019e00)},
  series       = {Handbook of Digital Politics},
  title        = {The internet as a civic space},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4337/9781782548768},
  year         = {2015},
}