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African farm trajectories and the sub-continental food crisis

Djurfeldt, Göran LU and Larsson, Rolf LU (2005)
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

African agriculture is more dynamic than one would expect, given the chronic food crisis in the sub-continent. Due to macro-economic and political preconditions, however, farmers’ dynamism is channelled into other directions than would be required to attain self-sufficiency in food grains. This is the main conclusion of this study of farm dynamics in eight African countries. It deals mainly with maize production and builds on data from a sample of farmers from eight countries south of the Sahara. It brings out both dynamism and stagnation, with an overall picture where potentials for production are not adequately exploited, and where farmers’ commercial energies are driven towards other food crops... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

African agriculture is more dynamic than one would expect, given the chronic food crisis in the sub-continent. Due to macro-economic and political preconditions, however, farmers’ dynamism is channelled into other directions than would be required to attain self-sufficiency in food grains. This is the main conclusion of this study of farm dynamics in eight African countries. It deals mainly with maize production and builds on data from a sample of farmers from eight countries south of the Sahara. It brings out both dynamism and stagnation, with an overall picture where potentials for production are not adequately exploited, and where farmers’ commercial energies are driven towards other food crops than grains, especially vegetables for urban markets. Commercial incentives in food grain production favour small groups of well-placed and usually male farmers, while, in the lack of seed-fertiliser technology and commercial incentives, smallholders devote their energies to other crops or to non-farm sources of income. To take sub-Saharan African towards self-sufficiency in food grains, the authors conclude, requires a re-orientation of agricultural policies, and determined support from the donors and the international community. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Working Paper
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
Green Revolution, Africa, sociology, sociologi, geography
project
Afrint project
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
385354cc-159c-484c-b7fb-b3549354a62a (old id 602154)
date added to LUP
2007-12-06 11:06:13
date last changed
2016-08-22 09:24:55
@misc{385354cc-159c-484c-b7fb-b3549354a62a,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
African agriculture is more dynamic than one would expect, given the chronic food crisis in the sub-continent. Due to macro-economic and political preconditions, however, farmers’ dynamism is channelled into other directions than would be required to attain self-sufficiency in food grains. This is the main conclusion of this study of farm dynamics in eight African countries. It deals mainly with maize production and builds on data from a sample of farmers from eight countries south of the Sahara. It brings out both dynamism and stagnation, with an overall picture where potentials for production are not adequately exploited, and where farmers’ commercial energies are driven towards other food crops than grains, especially vegetables for urban markets. Commercial incentives in food grain production favour small groups of well-placed and usually male farmers, while, in the lack of seed-fertiliser technology and commercial incentives, smallholders devote their energies to other crops or to non-farm sources of income. To take sub-Saharan African towards self-sufficiency in food grains, the authors conclude, requires a re-orientation of agricultural policies, and determined support from the donors and the international community.},
  author       = {Djurfeldt, Göran and Larsson, Rolf},
  keyword      = {Green Revolution,Africa,sociology,sociologi,geography},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {African farm trajectories and the sub-continental food crisis},
  year         = {2005},
}