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Dynamics of Energy-Efficient Technology for Commercial Buildings in Sweden: How much can really be achieved and how fast?

Christiansson, Lena A and Swisher, Joel (1995) ECEEE Summer Study, 1995 In Sustainability and the Reinvention of Government. A Challenge for Energy Efficiency.
Abstract
This paper discusses the results of a time-dynamic analysis of the possible effects of government and utility-sponsored energy-efficiency programs on electric energy use in Swedish commercial buildings. In the study, which includes efficient lighting, improvements in ventilation, commercial cooling and cooking, we use energy scenarios to analyse how policy measures can effect future energy demand. The focus is on dynamic scenarios of electricity demand and efficiency improvement, based on energy performance standards and utility demand-side management (DSM) investment. The scenarios account for the dynamics of equipment turnover, existing trends in technology, and the distribution of energy efficiency among equipment models on the... (More)
This paper discusses the results of a time-dynamic analysis of the possible effects of government and utility-sponsored energy-efficiency programs on electric energy use in Swedish commercial buildings. In the study, which includes efficient lighting, improvements in ventilation, commercial cooling and cooking, we use energy scenarios to analyse how policy measures can effect future energy demand. The focus is on dynamic scenarios of electricity demand and efficiency improvement, based on energy performance standards and utility demand-side management (DSM) investment. The scenarios account for the dynamics of equipment turnover, existing trends in technology, and the distribution of energy efficiency among equipment models on the market.



Many of these technologies are cost-effective and likely to be implemented in time, especially if electricity prices increase. For commercial lighting, the scenarios show that demand-side management (DSM) programs, based on a utility-sponsored shared-savings approach, could keep energy use constant until 2020 despite 45 percent growth in energy services, i.e. growth in lumen-hours per year. Including other commercial end-uses electrical energy use would increase somewhat despite demand-side management (DSM) programs. Energy performance standards are including retrofit measures. Of particular interest are the results indicating important synergies in terms of the timing of the two types of programs. In this paper we show that a combination of utility DSM programs and energy performance standards could keep future energy use low. Other combinations of policies such as energy performance standards and technology procurement programs could also be of great interest. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Energy conservation, Electric energy, Buildings, Tertiary activities, Sweden, Lighting, Management, Demand, Technology, Standards, Europe
in
Sustainability and the Reinvention of Government. A Challenge for Energy Efficiency.
editor
Persson, Agneta
pages
12 pages
publisher
European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE)
conference name
ECEEE Summer Study, 1995
ISBN
91-631-4002-0
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
b7d5f4cb-b0fe-46b4-a7af-2fe41468c6de (old id 604134)
alternative location
http://www.eceee.org/conference_proceedings/eceee/1995/Panel_5/p5_1/
date added to LUP
2009-04-01 09:02:03
date last changed
2016-06-29 09:04:54
@misc{b7d5f4cb-b0fe-46b4-a7af-2fe41468c6de,
  abstract     = {This paper discusses the results of a time-dynamic analysis of the possible effects of government and utility-sponsored energy-efficiency programs on electric energy use in Swedish commercial buildings. In the study, which includes efficient lighting, improvements in ventilation, commercial cooling and cooking, we use energy scenarios to analyse how policy measures can effect future energy demand. The focus is on dynamic scenarios of electricity demand and efficiency improvement, based on energy performance standards and utility demand-side management (DSM) investment. The scenarios account for the dynamics of equipment turnover, existing trends in technology, and the distribution of energy efficiency among equipment models on the market.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Many of these technologies are cost-effective and likely to be implemented in time, especially if electricity prices increase. For commercial lighting, the scenarios show that demand-side management (DSM) programs, based on a utility-sponsored shared-savings approach, could keep energy use constant until 2020 despite 45 percent growth in energy services, i.e. growth in lumen-hours per year. Including other commercial end-uses electrical energy use would increase somewhat despite demand-side management (DSM) programs. Energy performance standards are including retrofit measures. Of particular interest are the results indicating important synergies in terms of the timing of the two types of programs. In this paper we show that a combination of utility DSM programs and energy performance standards could keep future energy use low. Other combinations of policies such as energy performance standards and technology procurement programs could also be of great interest.},
  author       = {Christiansson, Lena A and Swisher, Joel},
  editor       = {Persson, Agneta},
  isbn         = {91-631-4002-0},
  keyword      = {Energy conservation,Electric energy,Buildings,Tertiary activities,Sweden,Lighting,Management,Demand,Technology,Standards,Europe},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {12},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x93c5f78)},
  series       = {Sustainability and the Reinvention of Government. A Challenge for Energy Efficiency.},
  title        = {Dynamics of Energy-Efficient Technology for Commercial Buildings in Sweden: How much can really be achieved and how fast?},
  year         = {1995},
}