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Microbiota patterns and risk of cardiometabolic disease - Opportunities for intervention?

Nilsson, Peter M. LU (2016) In Arterial Hypertension 20(1). p.1-4
Abstract

In every human being, there is a substantial proportion (1-2 kg) of total body weight constituted by the gut microbiota content in the gastro-intestinal system. Recent research findings, based on mapping of the microbiome, have stated that in healthy subjects, the gut microbiota richness and diversity is higher as compared to obese subjects or patients suffering from cardiometabolic disease, or even long-standing hypertension when a different and less rich pattern is seen (dysbiosis). Intervention with certain food constituents, e.g. Mediterranean diet or dairy products such as lactobacillae-containing yoghurt, holds promise that this could be of benefit for improved organ function, improved metabolism and lowering disease risk.... (More)

In every human being, there is a substantial proportion (1-2 kg) of total body weight constituted by the gut microbiota content in the gastro-intestinal system. Recent research findings, based on mapping of the microbiome, have stated that in healthy subjects, the gut microbiota richness and diversity is higher as compared to obese subjects or patients suffering from cardiometabolic disease, or even long-standing hypertension when a different and less rich pattern is seen (dysbiosis). Intervention with certain food constituents, e.g. Mediterranean diet or dairy products such as lactobacillae-containing yoghurt, holds promise that this could be of benefit for improved organ function, improved metabolism and lowering disease risk. Randomized, controlled intervention studies are needed to test the hypothesis that a reduction in dysbiosis induced by external dietary interventions could translate into health benefits.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cardiometabolic disease, Microbiota
in
Arterial Hypertension
volume
20
issue
1
pages
4 pages
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84976869233
ISSN
2449-6162
DOI
10.5603/AH.2016.0001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
62829f14-39e2-4a6f-acf4-159feba25ca7
date added to LUP
2016-07-18 08:29:11
date last changed
2016-07-21 11:20:52
@misc{62829f14-39e2-4a6f-acf4-159feba25ca7,
  abstract     = {<p>In every human being, there is a substantial proportion (1-2 kg) of total body weight constituted by the gut microbiota content in the gastro-intestinal system. Recent research findings, based on mapping of the microbiome, have stated that in healthy subjects, the gut microbiota richness and diversity is higher as compared to obese subjects or patients suffering from cardiometabolic disease, or even long-standing hypertension when a different and less rich pattern is seen (dysbiosis). Intervention with certain food constituents, e.g. Mediterranean diet or dairy products such as lactobacillae-containing yoghurt, holds promise that this could be of benefit for improved organ function, improved metabolism and lowering disease risk. Randomized, controlled intervention studies are needed to test the hypothesis that a reduction in dysbiosis induced by external dietary interventions could translate into health benefits.</p>},
  author       = {Nilsson, Peter M.},
  issn         = {2449-6162},
  keyword      = {Cardiometabolic disease,Microbiota},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--4},
  series       = {Arterial Hypertension},
  title        = {Microbiota patterns and risk of cardiometabolic disease - Opportunities for intervention?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5603/AH.2016.0001},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2016},
}