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A comparison of Lotens foot model and data from subjects: the use of boot insulation measured with thermal foot model in calculations

Kuklane, Kalev LU ; Holmér, Ingvar LU and Havenith, George (1999) The 8th International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics (ICEE 8) In Environmental Ergonomics VIII. p.407-410
Abstract
A model for foot skin temperature prediction was evaluated on the basis of an experiment on subjects at -10.7 °C (light seated manual work) with winter boots. Insulation of the footwear was measured on a thermal foot model. The predicted temperature stayed higher for the whole exposure period and the difference between the predicted and the measured foot skin temperatures grew proportionally with time, while subsequent warm-up curves at room temperature were almost parallel. Predicted and measured data showed a good correlation (r=0.95). However, the paired t-test showed significant differences between measured and predicted foot skin temperatures. When the insulation values were reduced for wetting and walking, then the t-test did not... (More)
A model for foot skin temperature prediction was evaluated on the basis of an experiment on subjects at -10.7 °C (light seated manual work) with winter boots. Insulation of the footwear was measured on a thermal foot model. The predicted temperature stayed higher for the whole exposure period and the difference between the predicted and the measured foot skin temperatures grew proportionally with time, while subsequent warm-up curves at room temperature were almost parallel. Predicted and measured data showed a good correlation (r=0.95). However, the paired t-test showed significant differences between measured and predicted foot skin temperatures. When the insulation values were reduced for wetting and walking, then the t-test did not show the differences any more.

The insulation values from thermal foot measurements can be used in the model calculations. Lotens’ foot model is using the blood flow as heat input parameter for feet (effect through Tcore). The Lotens foot model can give reasonable foot skin temperature values if the model limitations are considered. It could be useful to develop the model further by taking into consideration various wetness levels and activity change. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Environmental Ergonomics
editor
Hodgdon, James A.; Heaney, Jay H. and Buono, Michael J.
volume
VIII
pages
4 pages
conference name
The 8th International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics (ICEE 8)
ISBN
0-9666953-1-3
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
dab4a6ec-c17f-464c-8e7d-aad97938cf7a (old id 634599)
date added to LUP
2008-09-24 13:05:44
date last changed
2016-04-16 12:03:47
@misc{dab4a6ec-c17f-464c-8e7d-aad97938cf7a,
  abstract     = {A model for foot skin temperature prediction was evaluated on the basis of an experiment on subjects at -10.7 °C (light seated manual work) with winter boots. Insulation of the footwear was measured on a thermal foot model. The predicted temperature stayed higher for the whole exposure period and the difference between the predicted and the measured foot skin temperatures grew proportionally with time, while subsequent warm-up curves at room temperature were almost parallel. Predicted and measured data showed a good correlation (r=0.95). However, the paired t-test showed significant differences between measured and predicted foot skin temperatures. When the insulation values were reduced for wetting and walking, then the t-test did not show the differences any more.<br/><br>
The insulation values from thermal foot measurements can be used in the model calculations. Lotens’ foot model is using the blood flow as heat input parameter for feet (effect through Tcore). The Lotens foot model can give reasonable foot skin temperature values if the model limitations are considered. It could be useful to develop the model further by taking into consideration various wetness levels and activity change.},
  author       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Holmér, Ingvar and Havenith, George},
  editor       = {Hodgdon, James A. and Heaney, Jay H. and Buono, Michael J.},
  isbn         = {0-9666953-1-3},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {407--410},
  series       = {Environmental Ergonomics},
  title        = {A comparison of Lotens foot model and data from subjects: the use of boot insulation measured with thermal foot model in calculations},
  volume       = {VIII},
  year         = {1999},
}