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Hip fracture, mortality risk, and cause of death over two decades

von Friesendorff, M. LU ; McGuigan, F. E. LU ; Wizert, A.; Rogmark, C. LU ; Holmberg, A. H. LU ; Woolf, A. D. and Åkesson, Kristina LU (2016) In Osteoporosis International 27(10). p.2945-2953
Abstract

Summary: Men and women with hip fracture have higher short-term mortality. This study investigated mortality risk over two decades post-fracture; excess mortality remained high in women up to 10 years and in men up to 20 years. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and pneumonia were leading causes of death with a long-term doubling of risk. Introduction: Hip fractures are associated with increased mortality, particularly short term. In this study with a two-decade follow-up, we examined mortality and cause of death compared to the background population. Methods: We followed 1013 hip fracture patients and 2026 matched community controls for 22 years. Mortality, excess mortality, and cause of death were analyzed and stratified for age and sex.... (More)

Summary: Men and women with hip fracture have higher short-term mortality. This study investigated mortality risk over two decades post-fracture; excess mortality remained high in women up to 10 years and in men up to 20 years. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and pneumonia were leading causes of death with a long-term doubling of risk. Introduction: Hip fractures are associated with increased mortality, particularly short term. In this study with a two-decade follow-up, we examined mortality and cause of death compared to the background population. Methods: We followed 1013 hip fracture patients and 2026 matched community controls for 22 years. Mortality, excess mortality, and cause of death were analyzed and stratified for age and sex. Hazard ratio (HR) was estimated by Cox regression. A competing risk model was fitted to estimate HR for common causes of death (CVD, cancer, pneumonia) in the short and long term (>1 year). Results: For both sexes and at all ages, mortality was higher in hip fracture patients across the observation period with men losing most life years (p <0.001). Mortality risk was higher for up to 15 years (women (risk ratio (RR) 1.9 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.7–2.1]); men (RR 2.8 [2.2–3.5])) and until end of follow-up ((RR 1.8 [1.6–2.0]); (RR 2.7 [2.1–3.3])). Excess mortality by time intervals, censored for the first year, was evident in women (80 years, for 5 years) and in men

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Age, Cause of death, Hip fracture, Mortality, Sex
in
Osteoporosis International
volume
27
issue
10
pages
9 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84966711815
ISSN
0937-941X
DOI
10.1007/s00198-016-3616-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6362ae90-5980-4f4e-b6de-4d7d34736e8f
date added to LUP
2016-06-01 12:38:41
date last changed
2016-10-13 09:09:15
@misc{6362ae90-5980-4f4e-b6de-4d7d34736e8f,
  abstract     = {<p>Summary: Men and women with hip fracture have higher short-term mortality. This study investigated mortality risk over two decades post-fracture; excess mortality remained high in women up to 10 years and in men up to 20 years. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and pneumonia were leading causes of death with a long-term doubling of risk. Introduction: Hip fractures are associated with increased mortality, particularly short term. In this study with a two-decade follow-up, we examined mortality and cause of death compared to the background population. Methods: We followed 1013 hip fracture patients and 2026 matched community controls for 22 years. Mortality, excess mortality, and cause of death were analyzed and stratified for age and sex. Hazard ratio (HR) was estimated by Cox regression. A competing risk model was fitted to estimate HR for common causes of death (CVD, cancer, pneumonia) in the short and long term (&gt;1 year). Results: For both sexes and at all ages, mortality was higher in hip fracture patients across the observation period with men losing most life years (p &lt;0.001). Mortality risk was higher for up to 15 years (women (risk ratio (RR) 1.9 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.7–2.1]); men (RR 2.8 [2.2–3.5])) and until end of follow-up ((RR 1.8 [1.6–2.0]); (RR 2.7 [2.1–3.3])). Excess mortality by time intervals, censored for the first year, was evident in women (80 years, for 5 years) and in men </p>},
  author       = {von Friesendorff, M. and McGuigan, F. E. and Wizert, A. and Rogmark, C. and Holmberg, A. H. and Woolf, A. D. and Åkesson, Kristina},
  issn         = {0937-941X},
  keyword      = {Age,Cause of death,Hip fracture,Mortality,Sex},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2945--2953},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9879b68)},
  series       = {Osteoporosis International},
  title        = {Hip fracture, mortality risk, and cause of death over two decades},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-016-3616-5},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2016},
}